stripped set screw

Page 1 of 2  
My tub deck faucet (two handle - cartridge type) is leaking. I can get the cold handle off, but after alternately turning off the water to hot and co ld, it seems like it's the hot one that has the problem. Naturally, that's the one that has a stripped set-screw (inset, hex slot).
Is there anything to try to get this thing off short of drilling it out? I f these cases are generally hopeless, I'll just cut to the chase and take t he necessary measures, but if there's any likely alternative, it would be p referable than having to get a new handle (I'd probably need to get two if I want matching handles, because this type is no longer made - it was disco ntinued when I bought it about 10 years ago.
If I had stripped the thing while trying to loosen it, I'd probably give up right away, but it was already stripped, so, I'm guessing it got stripped when being tightened. I swear that was done by the plumber who installed i t and not me. Well, maybe it was me, but if so, I have conveniently erased that memory. In any case, this means I haven't really been able to apply a ny torque to the thing at all. it's possible (though probably not likely) that with a little bit of torque, it could loosen up and then I could just get a new set screw instead of two new handles. These are pretty fancy, so near-matching replacements would probably cost a pretty penny. I don't th ink the wife would go for the small vice-grips-as-relpacement solution.
I thought of putting some super-glue on the end of an allen wrench, stickin g it in there, letting it dry and then giving it a go. But if there are an y better ideas, It might be prudent to try something else first.
Thanks for any suggestions.
-J
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A few years ago I had the same problem with my kitchen faucet.
I bought a set of screw extractors and finally got the set screw out.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/20/13 8:52 AM, J wrote:

cold handle off, but after alternately turning off the water to hot and cold, it seems like it's the hot one that has the problem. Naturally, that's the one that has a stripped set-screw (inset, hex slot).

these cases are generally hopeless, I'll just cut to the chase and take the necessary measures, but if there's any likely alternative, it would be preferable than having to get a new handle (I'd probably need to get two if I want matching handles, because this type is no longer made - it was discontinued when I bought it about 10 years ago.

right away, but it was already stripped, so, I'm guessing it got stripped when being tightened. I swear that was done by the plumber who installed it and not me. Well, maybe it was me, but if so, I have conveniently erased that memory. In any case, this means I haven't really been able to apply any torque to the thing at all. it's possible (though probably not likely) that with a little bit of torque, it could loosen up and then I could just get a new set screw instead of two new handles. These are pretty fancy, so near-matching replacements would probably cost a pretty penny. I don't think the wife would go for the small vice-grips-as-relpacement solution.

it in there, letting it dry and then giving it a go. But if there are any better ideas, It might be prudent to try something else first.

Take a look at this tool. It should work for you.
http://www.walmart.com/ip/BOA-Grabit-Screw-Extractor/15162110
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I forgot to mention one other problem: Because of the positioning of the handle, no matter how I turn it there's at most about 7" of clearance between it and a wall. It only makes about a quarter turn between fully closed and fully open.
So I'm not sure I will be able to use a screw extractor. Come to think of it, this would probably also prevent me from drilling the thing out.
-J
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

handle, no matter how I turn it there's at most about 7" of clearance between it and a wall. It only makes about a quarter turn between fully closed and fully open.

Replacement handles are cheap. [usually] Get your Dremel out and some fiber disks, and cut that handle out of your way.
Don't have a Dremel? All the better. . . Go buy a Dremel and some fiber disks- play with your cool new tool.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/20/2013 8:15 AM, J wrote:

Right angle drill attachment--but it'll be tough drilling as the allen screw is likely hardened.
Can try modifying a standard extractor to just the length need to try to get purchase on outside; generally one small enough will have too long a taper and will bottom out before can actually grab the sides.
If not terribly corroded, getting "creative" may help...this guy's problem wasn't an allen screw, but perhaps can spark an idea or two..,
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?tg4458
--



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/20/2013 8:15 AM, J wrote:

J, the screw extractors work well and you can get a right angle chuck for your drill from Harbor freight. We had to buy one for a job we were on that had screws in a very hard to get at place. ^_^
http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?q=right+angle+drill+chuck
http://tinyurl.com/powwgo7
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Daring Dufas wrote:

Hmm, If I were you, I'd just take the whole fixture out and replace it with new one. Is there a guarantee screw extracter or Dremel cutting disc will work in a restricted space? How much time to spend? Time is money you know. I always look for simple easy way.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Plus, the faucet stem is prolly maimed, also. Probably cheaper in the long run to replace entire fixture.
nb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/20/2013 9:59 AM, Tony Hwang wrote:

I loaned the guys my Dremel tool this week so they could cut channels in the crown molding on a job so they could put wire mold on the wall. My Dremel tool is the best thing I ever bought and so versatile. I've used it to cut out all sorts of seized screws and bolts. I once had to get a broken stud out of the head on a 15kw Onan genset and the Dremel tool was the only tool that I could use to get it out. The OP may have to use a Dremel tool to get the defective parts out for replacement. ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 20 Jun 2013 08:33:20 -0500, The Daring Dufas

For the record, none of these is the angle thing I talk about last in my ot her post, but I searched HF for drill and none of the 62 hits were what I meant. Maybe they don't sell it anymore.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, June 20, 2013 9:15:13 AM UTC-4, J wrote:

handle, no matter how I turn it there's at most about 7" of clearance between it and a wall. It only makes about a quarter turn between fully closed and fully open.
It nust be a really big handle, if 7" of clearance isn't enough? And 7" isn't enough for a drill?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

handle, no matter how I turn it there's at most about 7" of clearance between it and a wall. It only makes about a quarter turn between fully closed and fully open.

For diilling it out, there is the right angle attachment to the drill, though that is probably longer than 7"
And there is the flexible shaft, though htat too might be more than 7", and
finally there is the thing at Harbor Freight, which uses special hex shank drills, also sold at HF, which is definitely under 7". The think is a flexible shaft, but it ends not with a chuck with jaws, but just a socket that takes the hex-shaft drill bits. IIRC, it looks a bit like a dentist's drill. The end, not counting the drill, is only about an inch or inch and a half, and the drill adds 3 inches or so, so it will fit in our space I think. The handle of the end is 45^ up so that will take up a bit of space. I'm not sure they drill has to go in exactly straight.
But try the expoxee first.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the cold handle off, but after alternately turning off the water to hot an d cold, it seems like it's the hot one that has the problem.  Naturally, that's the one that has a stripped set-screw (inset, hex slot).

 If these cases are generally hopeless, I'll just cut to the chase and ta ke the necessary measures, but if there's any likely alternative, it would be preferable than having to get a new handle (I'd probably need to get two if I want matching handles, because this type is no longer made - it was d iscontinued when I bought it about 10 years ago.

up right away, but it was already stripped, so, I'm guessing it got strippe d when being tightened.  I swear that was done by the plumber who install ed it and not me.  Well, maybe it was me, but if so, I have conveniently erased that memory. In any case, this means I haven't really been able to a pply any torque to the thing at all.  it's possible (though probably not likely) that with a little bit of torque, it could loosen up and then I cou ld just get a new set screw instead of two new handles.  These are pretty fancy, so near-matching replacements would probably cost a pretty penny.  I don't think the wife would go for the small vice-grips-as-relpacement solution.

ing it in there, letting it dry and then giving it a go.  But if there ar e any better ideas, It might be prudent to try something else first.

As Jim Elbrecht said, use a Dremel motor tool or the Harbor Freight equivalent to regrind the slot in the screw. It may also put a partial slot in the handle, but you don't seem too concerned about that. Or, as others have said, just use a regular screw extractor. They are threaded to grab the screw when your drill is rotating in the reverse direction, and work fine as long as you drill a small hole in the middle of the screw to get some surface for the extractor to grab..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, June 20, 2013 8:52:37 AM UTC-4, J wrote:

he cold handle off, but after alternately turning off the water to hot and cold, it seems like it's the hot one that has the problem. Naturally, that 's the one that has a stripped set-screw (inset, hex slot).

If these cases are generally hopeless, I'll just cut to the chase and take the necessary measures, but if there's any likely alternative, it would be preferable than having to get a new handle (I'd probably need to get two i f I want matching handles, because this type is no longer made - it was dis continued when I bought it about 10 years ago.
If it's really stripped, then drilling it out is the only option. But that shouldn't be hard. I'd soak it in penetrating oil if you haven't already. Then drill it out. Many times it will come out just doing that. If necessary, then use a screw extractor.

up right away, but it was already stripped, so, I'm guessing it got strippe d when being tightened. I swear that was done by the plumber who installed it and not me.
In a recent thread it was pointed out as a suggested technique to deal with a loose screw to bugger up the threads to tighten it up and that it was a plumber's trick. Sounded like a bad idea to me. Maybe it was done to yours...
Well, maybe it was me, but if so, I have conveniently erased that memory. I n any case, this means I haven't really been able to apply any torque to th e thing at all. it's possible (though probably not likely) that with a lit tle bit of torque, it could loosen up and then I could just get a new set s crew instead of two new handles. These are pretty fancy, so near-matching replacements would probably cost a pretty penny. I don't think the wife wo uld go for the small vice-grips-as-relpacement solution.

ing it in there, letting it dry and then giving it a go. But if there are any better ideas, It might be prudent to try something else first.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There are 'left handed' drill bits. They are made so you run the drill in reverse. After a good day or two of soaking in the penetrating oil, a left handed bit may just grab the screw and back it out. If not, then the screw extractor can be used.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 20 Jun 2013 07:32:01 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

cold handle off, but after alternately turning off the water to hot and cold, it seems like it's the hot one that has the problem. Naturally, that's the one that has a stripped set-screw (inset, hex slot).

these cases are generally hopeless, I'll just cut to the chase and take the necessary measures, but if there's any likely alternative, it would be preferable than having to get a new handle (I'd probably need to get two if I want matching handles, because this type is no longer made - it was discontinued when I bought it about 10 years ago.

If you drill it out with a left handed drill bit, available in a set of 4 at Harbor Freight, often the left-handed turning during the drilling will unscrew the screw at the same time. use a bit smaller than the hole so you don't mess up the threads any more than they are.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Somehow I don't see HF selling real HSS lefty bits. If they're not HSS, yer wasting yer time/$$$.
nb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You may not see it, but I gather you don't own any. I do and they work well. They probably say HSS but I'm not going to go look, because regardless of what they say, I've drllled out several screws, all of which had holes in them after I drilled a while, and most of which unscrewed before I was done drilling in them. IOW, they work well. If they work only once, it's worth the money for the whole set.
The only other left-handed option is a major drill maker, whose name escapes me, who sells bits one at at a time and a collection of 4 is a lot more than a set at HF.
They don't seem to sell a set of 4 anymore, just a set of 13, for $10. More money but 9 more drills Well worth it.
http://www.harborfreight.com/13-piece-left-hand-drill-bit-set-95146.html
from 1/16 to 1/4 by 64ths, in a metal case.
Needs a reversible drill of course.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But, you'll post a link and not read it? Yeah, they ARE HSS. Read yer own link, dolt. And no, I don't own any, living 150 mi from the hearest HF. Fortunately, I know how to read.
nb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.