stripped screw hole in junction box

Sometimes, when working on receptacles I run into stripped screw holes. These holes are built-in to the junction box which is made of plastic or some brownish and brittle material.
I suspect this was caused by someone trying to overcome a too-crowded (or poorly laid out) junction box by using these screws to force the receptacle into the box.
What is the solution without replacing the junction box?
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John writes:

Drill and tap the next larger size screw.
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For plastic boxes a #6 drywall screw is a common solution. For metal boxes I normally retap the hole with a 6/32 or 8/32 tap.

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Some years back, I picked up a really handy tool -- looks like a screwdriver, but with multiple taps --6-32, 8-32, and 10-32. Very easy to use for this sort of situation.
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professorpaul wrote:

Yes, I have one of those too, but it only works if the hole is deep enough (or goes right through the part) to get to the larger sizes you need.
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
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John wrote:

just slide a tootpick or two into the hole then the screw can bite and pull, it will hold
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Oversized self tapping screw or sheet metal screw.
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You answered your own question. If the box is too small it should be replaced with the right size.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/stripped-screw-hole-in-junction-box-141464-.htm mpw wrote:
John wrote:

Over time, the plastic outlet boxes can become brittle and break, also inserting screws that are self tapping or drywall screws will cause the threads to strip and or crack and often prevent the outlet from seating flush. I am assuming that the existing box has adequate cubic inch rateing and is not overfilled.(you can't put one ton in a half ton truck).If the box is undersized, you will have to remove and replace it. If the box is not undersized you can try glue, expoxy,tape or a G-clip
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mpw wrote:

inserting screws that are self tapping or drywall screws will cause the threads to strip and or crack and often prevent the outlet from seating flush.

overfilled.(you can't put one ton in a half ton truck).If the box is undersized, you will have to remove and replace it.

Interesting. Here is a link to the appropriate form of G-Clip (I never heard of them before, but then I don't get out much):
http://www.g-clip.us /
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When I have stripped holes, I put a wooden match or toothpick in the hole, or part of one.

inserting screws that are self tapping or drywall screws will cause the threads to strip and or crack and often prevent the outlet from seating flush.

not overfilled.(you can't put one ton in a half ton truck).If the box is undersized, you will have to remove and replace it.

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On Sun, 09 Sep 2012 02:44:01 +0000, mpw

threads to strip and or crack and often prevent the outlet from seating flush.

Plastic electrical boxes suck! Not only do the screws strip, but in case of an overheated connection, the box will melt or burn. Nails can also be accidentally driven into them, which will short things out. I dont and wont use them. Metal boxes cost more, but last almost forever.
As far as your problem, take an extra long screw of the proper gauge, put a nut on it, and screw the nut all the way to the screw's head. Epoxy the screw in the plastic box, leaving 3/8 or 1/2 inch sticking out. When the epoxy is dry, saw off the screw head and remove that nut. Install the outlet and use the nut to attach it. (Same principal as a stud bolt). You may have to cut or file off more of that "stud" to make the cover plate fit.
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Junction box is too small. I thought it was an accomplishment to do it in a Corvair man years ago.
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How do you thread a nut onto a screw?
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On Sun, 9 Sep 2012 18:55:50 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

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On Sun, 09 Sep 2012 19:05:51 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Which is what I was referring to!!!
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On Sun, 09 Sep 2012 12:30:30 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@thecave.com wrote:

epoxy the nut into the box so you can use a proper screw in the plate.
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