Strange Screws

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Stan Blazejewski wrote:

Examine that filter carefully and you will find that its primary function is to filter the tiny amount of air moving through the pressure-equalization hole and that there is no mechanism by which all or any significant portion of the air circulating inside the capsule can be made to pass through it.

It dies as soon as something hard enough to scratch the platter or head and small enough to get wedged between them finds its way into that space.
In the real world people have tried this, and the drives typically died in anywhere from a few hours to a few weeks.

--
--John
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Well, having managed a real clean room , you are way off base. First of all, the particle count is per cubic foot. Clean rooms are classified by the sustained particle count averaged around the entire room.
The average count in a typical home/office/light industrial room is about 500,000 particles per cubic foot, and the particlas are quite large (several microns or tens of microns).
The first level of clean room we define is a class 100,000. This isn't a real hard level to achieve and can sometimes be done without real expensive HEPA filters if the working conditions are clean enough. The Space Shuttle high bay room is maintained at class 100,000 (my experience is with NASA).
The next level is a class 10,000, which certainly requires a high level of filtering and monitering with special clothing for the occupants. Next comes a class 1000 which is getting serious. You are into laminar flow air systems and special training for the people.
Computer chips are assembled in class 100 or even class 10 (!) rooms, since a single particle can ruin a product. At this level, even the way you move can disturb the room's particle count. Everyone is trained to move slowly and be aware of where the downwash from the airflow over your body goes.
By this level, the particle size is usually measured at a much smaller, sub-micron level also. A single small tear in a HEPA filter can take the room out of spec for quite some time, requiring a long, slow damp swabbing of all surfaces.
Dennis
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you could contruct a clean box to stifle the clean room naybobs
somewhere, (i am looking for link in my encyclopedic favorites), on web there was a design plan for clean room box involving a sturdy cardboard box , spray contact cement, largish HEPA filter, shop vac, heavy ~ 5mil clear plastic, duct tape then some spray either anti-static or water mist ? can't remeber
well most could probably figure out how this stuff was used the only trick was purging of contaminates when it was exposed when opening the box

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wrote:

Interessting.
Arno
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Arno Wagner wrote:

Interesting but the drive is running on borrowed time. Perhaps you should store all your critical data on it and see how long it continues to operate like that.
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I'd dare to guess that if this fellow doesn't recognize a Torx screw that he isn't aware that he should never open a hard drive.
Torx screws are seldom used for no other purpose then to keep the prying eyes of consumers from sensitive stuff. Thats why they're used in elevators.
My son has actually opened a defective laptop hard drive before and amazingly it still functioned, for only a short time. Now its a paperweight.
Handi
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I guess you can't recognize one either. :-) What he has is not a Torx screw.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

The same to you.

Yes it is, as someone else showed from the Wiha page.
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Try again.

No, it's not. This is a five-pointed star. Torx screws have six points.
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

And the 5 pointed star is a Torx too. There is no such thing as *the* "torx" screw.
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Not correct.

Also not correct. But you seem impervious to logic, so I'm done.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Handi wrote:

Many will make one good drive from two bad ones. Some fails in electronics part some fails in mechanical part. Tony
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Not an accurate statement.
Torx drive screws have been used on vehicles for ten years plus. They are not (in their standard form) an anti tamper fastener.
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Definitely correct. For anti-tamper there is Torx with a pin in the middle that needs a Torx driver with a hole. Standard Torx is just very well suited for automated mounting and also very well suited to use with a Torx bit in an electric drill. Here you get a lot of "Spax" wood screws with Torx head.
Torx is optimised for maximum torque without damaging the tool or screw and easier insertion than the standard 6-way symmetric format. IMO ist qualifies as possibly the best all around screw head format.
Arno
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Yes... you can actually hold the screw with the screwdriver... that is, put the screw on the end of the screwdriver, then move it into position.
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Exactly.
Arno
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I hadn't thought about that, but I had noticed that it stays on the tip without magnetism, even when the tip is horizontal.
The tip won't slip out of the slot either, the advantage of Phillips head. I wonder how long until there are chrome torx screws for decorative places.
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I don't know. Recall that it took Phillips about 40 years to catch on (invented in the 1940s, not really dominant until the 1980s if memory serves me right). Torx should catch on by the middle of the century...
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Square drive (eg: Canadian "Robertson") are almost as good. I drove several hundred 3" deck screws through flooring yesterday - once put on the driver, they stayed put on the driver and could be started and driven without touching the screw.
No cam-out either.
I still think they should make the manufacture and sale of slotted and phillips screws a capital offence.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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On Mon, 16 Jan 2006 21:12:48 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

That would be like making digitial tv the standard, and non-digital tv's dificult to use.
Think of all the screwdrivers that would have to go on welfare.
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