Strange observations during a power outage

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HeyBub wrote:

Most distribution transformers are air cooled. The ones that are oil cooled use non-flammable oil. Currently silicone oil and previously PCBs.

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When I lived in Ga there was a small substation, a subsub station if you will behind the place I worked. This substation fed an industrial park and quite a large residential area.When lightning hit one of the transformers there it blew and so did one of the transformers that fed where I worked, we had three for three phase power. Power was out in a patchwork all over the residential area and 3 or four other transformers also blew up scattered around the subdivision. On one road in particular you could tell that every third street off the road was without power.
Jimmie
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wrote:

<SNIP>
I do remember one power outage (of many) at my workplace where some strange noises emanated, and the only incandescent light at the workplace glowed to an extent typical of about 16 volts. I had a voltmeter handy and it indicated about 40 volts. So I suspect a bunch of noise from UPS units and a few generators, plus maybe a bit of RF pickup from the many nearby radio transmitters. This was in the University City section of Philadelphia, in an urban zip code (19144) having 4 hospitals for people and 1 for animals.
That power outage did not damage anything.
A few or several months before that was the power "outage" where for the first 45 minutes or hour or so (I disclaim accurate memory of amount of time of the following stressful condition), the voltage was about 45 volts. I did not have a voltmeter handy. The only incandescent lamp at the shop glowed to an extent that I consider typical of about 45 volts. The fluorescent fixtures (with electronic ballasts) gave an eerie very dim glow. Two refrigeration devices had compressor motors being burnt out. Someone I know suggests that a transformer upstream from my shop could have a 13,200 volt primary with a 4,600 volt tap, and the 4,600 volt feeding power got switched to the 13,200 volt primary connection as a result of an overload. The overload could be from rich college kids having 42 inch plasma TVs and refrigerators for beer in most bedrooms and most living rooms and 300 watt halogen torchiere lamps almost everywhere and computers running in most bedrooms. I say "have the flashlights handy" when the weather gets warm enough to need air conditioning during the "school year" to remove the heat produced by all those beer cooling refrigerators, 42 inch plasma TVs and 300 watt halogen lamps that my workplace's neighbors have!

- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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On 3/30/2009 9:02 PM Don Klipstein spake thus:

Not a great example: TVs don't use that much juice, nor do computers. 300-watt torchieres could add up to something significant pretty quickly (my term for those lamps is "firestarters").
I probably use more power than your neighbors, as I have an electric water heater (small one, 20 gal.) and an electric dryer. (But no air conditioner, thank you.)
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snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

For same screen area, CRT uses the most power, plasma uses a little less, and LCD uses the least. Plasma TVs are big power consumers by generally being made in larger sizes.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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On Tue, 31 Mar 2009 07:24:12 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

AN LSC screen draws constant power while a Plasma draws varying power depending on the screen contents. Highest draw is all white screen (means all cells fired) while minimum draw is with black sctreen (no cells fired).
Actual AVERAGE power use is very similar for equal sized screens - and something just over half an equivalent CRT.
Remember also, Plasma is 42" and above (perhaps a few 37") while CRT generally maxes out ar 42" and LCD can go from 2" to 60 or more. So particularly with Plasma, the power is directly related to size, while less so with CRT and LCD.
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

There is something that a lot of folks don't realize as having detrimental effects on the power grid and the power distribution of homes and business. This has developed under our noses and most people never considered it. Asymmetrical loads from switching power supplies can damage older power transformers that were not designed to handle the harmonics produced by modern electronic equipment. It's hard to explain it to a lot of electricians because many of them have no electronics background. I found a link to a site with a lot of good information on the problem.
http://tinyurl.com/cn4gv8
TDD
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