"strange" Automobile intruder/break-in

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I'm in Southern California visiting relatives, and last night my toyota avalon was invaded
but nothing was taken! [a camera, cell phone, 2 pistols] but everything was moved around
by coincidence[?], we had a power outage in the area, from around Midnight to 3am
I lock my car, as automatically as I put my seat belt on, 99% of the time; but it is possible it was left open
1. they just wanted the car, but couldn't start it?
big mystery!
marc
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On 7/19/2013 3:48 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Did they USE the camera or phone? Make a police report?
Was your wife looking to get the goods on you? Leaving a bugging device? Kids looking for gum or coins, or playing in the car?
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camera & cell phone look totally unused; no wife or kids
if they just wanted to leave a bugging device, they wouldn't let me know they were obviously there; everything was moved around
marc
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com Wrote in message:

Not so. Did you look for a bugging device? By distracting you with the mess, they managed to make you assume there's no bugging device. Had they not made a mess while bugging your car, but accidentally knocked a single item out of place, you'd be suspicious and start looking around. Instead, you looked at the mess and posted in a.h.r, leaving the bugging device right where it is.
Could you move a little bit closer to the rear view mirror when you speak...you're breaking up.
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On Friday, July 19, 2013 1:15:41 PM UTC-7, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Where are you, exactly? I want one of those pistols!
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com Wrote in message:

Look on your cell phone or camera for a picture of someone with one of your pistols up their butt.
Don't they do that with toothbrushes? ;-)
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On 7/19/2013 12:48 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

i had someone break into my truck once, but leave (expensive) stuff from a previous breakin. i guessed that they were interrupted when doing my truck and booked too soon. i managed to trace the other stuff's owners from a receipt conveniently left behind, and found that they had had their car broken into and torched that night also.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It seems odd to me that you would leave your cell phone in your car. Just like you automatically lock your car, I would think you would take your cell phone with you. Or, maybe it was a second cell phone.
Notwithstanding the above, maybe it was just someone (maybe a kid) who needed a place to sleep for a few hours (or get out of a storm if that's what knocked the power out), and who had no interest in stealing anything from you or anyone else. And, if your car was unlocked, that seemed like a good and easy place to crash out for a few hours.
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<stuff snipped>

a

That happened to my uncle, who was driving down the road when the guy who had been sleeping in the back seat of the car woke up and politely asked to be let out. Spooked the daylights out of my uncle. Back then people didn't lock up their cars very often.
--
Bobby G.



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My dad once found a guy sleeping in his trunk.
Well, actually the guy was unconscious in the trunk. My dad had the trunk open while he was changing a flat in the front. Just as he was tightening the lugs nuts, he heard a crash, the car lurched forward and fell off the jack. He went to the back of the car to find a motorcycle lying on the ground and the unconscious driver in his trunk.
Turned out the guy was drunk, not badly injured, and under arrest when he woke up.
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<stuff snipped>

That sure trumps my story!
--
Bobby G.




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I don't know...I'd be pretty freaked out if I thought I was alone and guy started talking to me from the back seat. I don't know that I'd be able to keep it on the road.
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wrote in message

You story ranks up there with the AFHV's video of a runner losing his ball cap and having it go flying through the air to land snugly on one of the racers coming up behind them. Sort of like doing a head/tails coin toss and having the coin land upright on its edge.
But my uncle *was* pretty spooked when he realized there was someone back there. He was going to work very early and the guy probably expected to be long gone before normal working hours.
--
Bobby G.



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On Sat, 20 Jul 2013 01:02:37 -0400, "Robert Green"

I remember that one.

I'd be spooked too.
Dawn usually wakes one up when he's sleeping in a car or outside.
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On Sat, 20 Jul 2013 01:24:31 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

The summer after high school I was coming home from work as a Fuller Brush man, driving through Ft. Benjamin Harrison and it was probably 6PM when they blew Taps and set off the cannon. When the cannon went off, they were so loud, like I was 10 feet away from one, and I was so startled I drove up on the sidewalk.
No one was around to notice. And it turned out the Taps and the cannon were recorded and played every day through speakers. I never saw the speakers, but they were sure loud.
I drove that way a lot, but I guess never at exactly 6.
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On Fri, 19 Jul 2013 18:10:06 -0400, "Robert Green"

Locking cars is over rated. I've been broken into three times over 50 years of driving. Total loss is a quart of oil I had in the back seat of my Karmann Ghia. Other cars on the street that were locked had broken windows, pry marks and the like. My brother had his convertible top slashed for a pair of sunglasses.
A pro will take your car in seconds if he wants it. An amateur will do lots of damage. I don't leave valuables in the car.
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<stuff snipped>

Volkswagen's elegant little "sportscar" I learned how to drive a stick in Dad's Karmann Ghia. Who would have thunk you could make a Beetle beautiful?
http://www.cartype.com/pics/3826/full/vw_karmann-ghia_rs1.jpg
Even the gear shift logo was impressive:
http://www.rossolson.com/rosso/fetish/ghia/images/wolfsburg-dark-thumb.jpg
Some drugged out asshole in a Chevy Impala ran a stop sign and sent the poor KG to the junkyard and nearly sent us to the boneyard. Most collision outcomes are dictated by the laws of physics and a teeny KG was no match for a 60's full-sized Chevy driven by a speed-freak. You always have a soft spot in your heart for the car you first learned to drive in. We had a very long driveway and when my parents were sleeping I would drive it up and down the driveway until I could shift smoothly without stalling the engine.

Youch. That had to piss him off. I don't think I would ever lock a ragtop for just that reason. Too easy to gain entry with a boxcutter or a pocketknife. My cousins in Italy not only leave their cars unlocked, the leave the glovebox open to show that it's empty and there's nothing worth stealing. Over there the idiot car thieves break the windows anyway because they ASSume the car is locked. A grizzled old beat cop I knew laughed about the number of times rookie cops dislocated their shoulders or worse breaking down doors that weren't locked to begin with.

Around here thieves with flatbeds posing as repo men have stolen a number of vehicles. You're right. It's like the Internet. If a real pro wants your car or wants to hack into your PC, you can probably slow them down, but not stop them.
I had $1000 worth of damage done by idiots trying to steal my Immobiliser (tm) protected van. The engine turns but never "catches" without the RF embedded key. Even the tow truck guy who was hauling it to the dealer for me was fooled by the RF anti-theft device and kept trying to start the car with a screwdriver in the steering column. Even *I* was fooled by it because I bought the car used without a manual and never knew it had an anti-theft feature. I thought it was a burglar alarm. Thieves made a dirty mess out of the steering column trying to steal it, though. )-:

Amen.

That's the important bottom line. I'd certainly *never* leave a pistol or two in the car unless I had a very well-designed secret hiding place. A long time ago when I had a carry permit as a police reporter, lots of places I went forbade even permit holders from bringing a gun onto the premises.
So I spent countless hours cutting away dash board top supports and putting hinges and magnets on the underside of the dashboard of my LTD. I did it so I could keep my Beretta hidden in there when I went someplace where it wasn't welcome. The "trap" was a work of art and I could have stored a short-barrel shotgun in there because there was so much room. Ah, to regain the boundless energy of youth. I look at a lot of things I built in my 20's and wonder where I got the drive and ambition to do things like install "traps" into cars and build my own furniture. Poverty and youth, I guess.
I also had a very loud alarm powered independently of the main battery because I had a number of scanner radios, a CB radio and cameras I had to leave in the car when I was working so leaving it unlocked was not practical because the radios were all mounted on slide mounts so I could reconfigure easily - those were the days of crystal-controlled scanners, long before the Bearcat 101 arrived with frequency synthesis. Locking the car and setting the alarm was a necessity.
It was a "retired" state trooper car bought at auction with multiple whip antennas and rear deck brake lights. Sadly, in the '70s thieves became so bold they even began breaking into cop cars, real and not-so-real ones like mine. The days of the 429ci engines may be gone, but they're not forgotten.
Nowadays there are shops that specialize in installing secret compartments in cars.
http://www.partyviberadio.com/forums/drugs/1994-common-vehicle-concealment-methods-united.html
<<Small traps are also used to conceal weapons. When the traps are used for this purpose, they are usually easily accessible and within reach of the driver or, in the case of someone being chauffeured, within easy reach of that person whether they are in the front or back seat. There have been numerous reported instances where law enforcement personnel have witnessed suspects entering vehicles with weapons in their hands, but have been unable to locate the weapons after the vehicle was stopped. Traps used for weapons concealment may be found in the passenger airbag compartment; in the doors; in seatbacks; in center-consoles; and under the carpeting at the driver's feet.>>
My feeling is that if you didn't install it yourself, how secret can it be? (-:
--
Bobby G.



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If I had locked the car, nowadays, how easy is it to get into a car? There were no signs of forced entry.
how do locksmiths get into cars?
marc
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Different dificulty, depending on the brand and model.
Honorable locksmiths don't tell people how to break in. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
If I had locked the car, nowadays, how easy is it to get into a car? There were no signs of forced entry.
how do locksmiths get into cars?
marc
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http://www.rd.com/home/improvement/13-things-your-locksmith-wont-tell-you/
http://www.lock-pro.com/blog/how-do-locksmiths-unlock-locked-vehicles/
The Slim Jim - The Slim Jim is a thin piece of metal which is inserted into the weather stripping that separates the driver's window from the door. The Slim Jim is designed to catch the locking mechanism in the door and allow it to be opened without a key.
Wedges - The Wedge is a device which separates the window just slightly so that a wire can be inserted into the car and allow the locksmith to reach the unlocking mechanism. Wedges are another device commonly utilized by locksmiths to assist those locked out of car, but they are typically the second choice to the Slim Jim, because they can require a bit more maneuvering.
Lock Picks - The lock pick is the most familiar tool for most locksmiths, but they are used much more commonly on homes and other non-mobile locks than they are on cars. Lock picks allow a locksmith to help a customer who is locked out by directly picking the lock and unlocking the car. Since, picking the lock requires even more time and skill it is done less frequently when the other options are available.
http://www.sevacall.com/blog/2013/03/s/locksmiths/how-to-open-locked-car-door/
The Coat Hanger Method 1. Fully uncoil the coat hanger. Make one side of the long piece of metal into a hook about the size of your finger. Make the hook into a U or V shape.
2. You will want to slide the hooked side in between the glass of the window and the protective rubber that is pressed against the glass. By pulling the rubber back, you will have an opening to stick the hook through.
3. Slide the hook inside the window and push it down 2-3 inches, then you will want to rotate the hook so that it is facing the inside of the car.
4. Feel around for the mechanism that controls the lock. If you do not succeed at first, continue trying. It may take several attempts until you successfully get under the lever and unlock the door.
The Suction Method
1. To use a plunger, apply some cream around the edge of the plunger, giving the plunger extra suction.
2. Place the plunger over the key hole so that the keyhole is directly in the middle of the plunger. With one forceful and direct pump, the lock should pop open. This takes time to perfect, so continue trying until you successfully unlock the lock.
You can also use a tennis ball for the suction method.
1. The tennis ball should have a small hole in it. This can be done by heating up a key or screw driver over the stove.
2. Once the metal object is hot enough, stick it into the ball and rotate the ball around it to try to shred the ball and make a hole.
3. Place the hole in the tennis ball directly over the keyhole. Hold the ball with one hand, and use your stronger hand to pump the hard to unlock the car door. The air pressure created from the suction of the ball can unlock the car door.
Google's got dozens of other suggestions on how to get inside your car when you're accidentally locked out.
--

Bobby G.





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