Strain relief for electrical cord on old appliance?

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When I did a search, the results were all way too big, like these:
http://www.alliedelec.com/search/productdetail.aspx?SKU#30976
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/strain-relief-connector/strain-relief/electrical/ecatalog/N-8fq
http://www.drillspot.com/products/43881/Hubbell_Kellems_073031209_Dust_Tight_Mesh_Grip
The opening in the housing is just barely larger than the cord and had no fitting whatsoever right now. That's why I was thinking rubber tubing that I could squeeze into the opening.
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On 2/8/2011 10:58 AM, Prof Wonmug wrote:

http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/strain-relief-connector/strain-relief/electrical/ecatalog/N-8fq
http://www.drillspot.com/products/43881/Hubbell_Kellems_073031209_Dust_Tight_Mesh_Grip
post / question did not make any reference to "barely larger", which is why I originally offered the possibility of a commercial strain relief or RTV.
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Yeah, I know. I never know how much information to include. I suppose I could have uploaded a photo and saved 1,000 words. ;-)
I just heard from Heyco that the strain relief bushings shipped today. We'll see.
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On 2/8/2011 12:25 AM, Prof Wonmug wrote:

Smarty posted a link to something that was probably the original type strain relief. The part snaps into a squared off hole that usually rounded at the top and bottom. The flat lamp cord lays in it and the retainer pushes the cable down into the housing which then snaps into the hole. It's easily done with slip joint pliers. You may find the strain reliefs in the parts drawers in the electrical aisle at Home Depot or in plastic bags hanging with other small electrical parts there.
TDD
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On Feb 8, 8:29 am, "Stormin Mormon"

Automotive stores offer a wide range of rubber plugs and grommets that may be useful. When I need one I tend to be more interested in finding a plug that will fit because I can always make a hole in it. Use these with the Underwriter's knot
Jimmie
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On Feb 8, 8:29 am, "Stormin Mormon"

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Prof Wonmug wrote:

There is a thing called 'black electrical tape'. Wrap the cord so that it fits tight in the hole. A knot in the inside will also provide strain relief. Or buy a plastic cord clamp that fits the hole.
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Electrical tape is a good idea if I can't find a grommet that will fit. Thanks.
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A strain relief is also suppose to reduce the amount of travel the cord bends at any point. Some "strain reliefs" do NOT do this.
I often use multiple heat shrinking on cords. Using a piece of tubing is also good. I use a Tywrap to secure, and often use hot melt glue to stabilize.
greg
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PW>> What I use is a coiled spring slide over cord and then twisted into the opening. The spring is the compression type. This allows the cord to bend in a larger radius sort of like the cords on a clothes iron. WW
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Prof Wonmug <wonmug moo.gov> wrote:

If you're good with hot melt glue, you can make strain relief for plugs with that. As always, clean the parts and make sure they get very hot.
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That's beyond my skill level. ;-)
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So rather than tell people this idea won't fit or that idea won't work because you don't know how to work with that kind of material -- why not post some pictures of the appliance in question...
At least one showing the cord where it exits the outside of the case and if you wanted SUPER advice, probably one of the inside of that point of the machine as well so that people can actually give you specific gizmos you could use to solve your problem...
~~ Evan
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On Tue, 8 Feb 2011 19:41:59 -0800 (PST), Evan

Yup. I should have done that. I thought this was a simple question, so I didn't bother. Also, the last time I posted a photo, I used a photo-sharing site and a couple of people complained that the link caused problems for their browser.
Anyway, I think I have a solution. Thanks.
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On Tue, 08 Feb 2011 18:49:40 -0800, Smitty Two

It's not that it pulls through the hole. I didn't make that clear. The copper wire inside the code eventually breaks from the bending back and forth just beyond the housing.
I think I've found a solution from Heyco.com.
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re: "The copper wire inside the code eventually breaks from the bending back and forth just beyond the housing. "
I'll assume you meant inside the "cord" not "code".
Tells us how that causes a short. Broken wires usually cause an open.
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