storm windows?

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On May 26, 3:13 pm, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

Depending on where you live.

Huh? No one uses electricity to heat their home?
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Umm, some of us with storm windows don't have AC in the first place. I'm in upstate NY and the storm windows came off 2 weeks ago. It was 94 F today, and believe me, it was brutal. I don't have AC in the house, just lots of trees, fans, and open windows, and it was about 83 F inside. Perfectly fine. My workshop, however, is attic space over my garage, and I have an AC unit in the only window. It was over 100 F all day up there, with the AC running full. Very uncomfy.
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On May 26, 3:13 pm, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

re: "Why do you waste hours fumbling with the storms..."
Hours? How many windows do you think I have?
P.S. I don't have storms anymore.
re"... to save a few pennies on electricity during the summer cooling season?"
errr...why not? Are you suggesting that I just throw the money out of the window...wait, I can't...they're closed.
Remember: "A Benny shaved is a Benny urned"
Look it up.
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Seems like there is some confusion in this thread between storm windows and storm sashes.
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On May 26, 2:13 pm, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

Electricity is now about more than twice as expensive than Ng for all the US by BTU output. There are electric furnaces and boilers, if it was cheaper everybody would be converting to electric.
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Convenience. I look at it this way:
In the summer, the outside air is rarely more than 20 F hotter than the inside air. Yes, I'm losing some, but I find it a tolerable amount.
In the winter, the temperature is typically 40-50 F lower outside than inside, and the winds are higher. I deploy the storms during the winter both to save money and to decrease drafts in the house.
I'm just not a person to squeeze every penny until Lincoln squeals.
Cindy Hamilton
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wrote:

...and that all makes sense.
Still, all things considered, I'm much happier with the overall convenience (and efficiency) of the replacement windows.
It's not only about the "up/down" issue. Toss in the tilt-in cleaning feature, the fewer surfaces that need to be cleaned, the ease of screen removal for cleaning, the overall look, the efficiency, the huge reduction in future maintenance, etc.
Keep in mind what started this thread: the OP asked about *adding* storms.
My suggestion was to go one step further, forgo the storms and replace the windows for all of the reasons stated above.
Now, in my case, I needed to reglaze most of my drafty single pane windows, repair a number of screens, recaulk the aluminum storms, paint the trim, etc. etc. I don't know the OP's skillsets, but I saved a ton of money by replacing the windows myself. While it may have been more expensive, I'm sure it was no more work to replace them than to try and bring the old ones up to snuff.
For my money, I got more convenience, better efficiency and a much better looking house. I just think that the OP should consider all of the factors involved before he writes the check for *adding* storm windows.
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Cindy Hamilton wrote:

Hell, 25 YO Andersens are just getting broken in. I know personally several houses with 50 YO Andersens that are still in fine shape. If you must replace, at least get a quality brand, not some damn vinyl windows.
Unless the frames are rotted, those Andersens should be good for another 20-30 years with a little tune-up and maybe some fresh weatherstripping where needed. And unlike most window companies, Andersen does make repair parts available, and even replacement sash kits, for their old windows. Very backward-compatible.
--
aem sends...

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Do a web search. I replaced all of the casement actuators in my previous house. It was an expensive proposition but a *lot* cheaper than new windows.
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fall, the storm windows will be in there when I would like to have my windows open. Or there won't be storm windows when it is still or already cold out. I have storm windows that can be opened and shut from inside the house; they just slide in a channel like the regular windows do in the next channel. But even then I have this problem, just not as much.
So in the late fall, I close the storm windows and then it's a beautiful day or night and I want them open again and I'm too lazy to get out of bed. (I can open and shut the main window by lifting my arms over my head, but not the storm windows.)
(If you have to install the windows from the outside, you're very very unlikely to take them out or put them in more than once for a season change. even more likely to have to do this when it's already cold and uncomfortable, but otoh, it should only take a few minutes.)
In the spring. It gets warm, then it gets cold again but the storm windows are open and the furnace runs more than it would if the storm windows were shut.
The altenrative is reglazing with thermopane, if possible and if there are no other leaks which would remain unplugged, or all new windows where the storm and reg. window open and shut together. Maybe I wasted money by not doing this when I first got here 27 years ago. I'm not sure.
Of course not every window in the house has to be done the same way. In one room, I pretty much don't open the windows, so there is no season change issue.
Also, storm windows keep in the air conditioning also.
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@ Cindy:
This post adds some detail to what I was talking about earlier.
It's those change of season periods, especially here in the northeast where you might want screens during the day, but need the furnace at night. Just this month we've had a high of 85 and a low of 34. Heck, it snowed on Mother's Day!
During AC season there's many a day (and night) when we want the screens, but certainly periods where the AC is desired. Running the AC with the storms up is pretty inefficient.
As I said earlier, being able to open any window - regardless of the obstruction - with one hand, is not only very convenient, it's also an economical advantage.
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Depends on how anal you want to get. I'm in the northeast also. Kitchen window has the storm down from about the end of December to the beginning of March. After that, some days we want to crack the window open while cooking. Bathroom windows stay down longer, but they are the first two opened come warmer weather. Some windows are never opened during the year so the storms stay down. Yes, it probably does cost me an extra few bucks a year for energy, but I'm willing to pay for convenience.
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re: "Yes, it probably does cost me an extra few bucks a year for energy, but I'm willing to pay for convenience."
As am I...and by replacing my leaky storms and single pane windows I get all the convenience I want *plus* I save money on my energy costs. Eventually my convenience will be free.
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Anything better? Probably any replacement window will have a better air seal, air infiltration can cost you as much in heat loss as single pane glass looses. www.energystar.gov should have work sheets to show you what energy savings different types of window afford and the payback for you. A Blower door test done for about 300 will show you air exchanges per day and where the leaks are. The best would be a triple pane with Low E argon but double pane is common , You realy cant do worse than old window frame technology and the new glasses made save energy winter and summer. You might find work sheets at major glass manufacturers also. Run numbers and see.
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