storm windows?

Page 1 of 2  

We have single glass windows throughout the house. Darn things are drafty in winter.
I'm thinking of adding storm windows on outside. Idea being that this gives us some "dead" insulation space between the two window panes.
Is going to storm windows a good way to go? Anything better?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's what they're for.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Another possibility is to reglaze the windows with thermopane panels, I did that with all my windows. But, if there is any air leakage around the windows, the storm windows will cut down air infiltration.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
rb wrote:

When I did it, it made a huge difference.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Only thing better is ot replace the windows with new. If you don't mind ladder work, you can DIY them and save a bunch of money.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What part of the world do you live in? What is worth doing in NY isn't necessarily worth [money wise] doing in VA.
I'm down to 3 more windows in my once drafty 100yr old house. I'm in NY- so we get some cold weather through the winter. I've been replacing all of the windows over 25 years. All DIY- and really not hard at all. [and all with "new construction" windows-- not just replacement sashes or windows]
In the meantime. . . 25 yr old combinations storms/screens are next to useless. Wooden storms are much better- but less convenient. Inside storms are much easier and sometimes more efficient.
I've used lexan with magnetic strips, sheet plastic with double sided tape, and heavy, insulated drapes. all were more efficient than any outside storms I've used.
But double-glazed, high-r windows, properly installed are the best of all. [and if you're farther north- triple-glazing might be the way to go]
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 24 May 2010 22:59:29 -0700, rb wrote:

We have the same sort of setup; our "inner" windows are all French-style with 8"x10" panes, storm windows are each just two large panes. All wooden frames and surrounds, and they make the place darn cold in winter (northern MN, so temps down to -30)
They're a total pain in the butt. They leak a ton of air around the edges, they're hard to get in place or take out (I'm sure they were fine when new, but years of slight settling of the house and lots of layers of paint doesn't help), and it's a hassle swapping them in and out for the mosquito screens twice a year and storing whichever I take out.
cheers
Jules
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
rb wrote:

Certainly it's cost effective. They don't cost much and are easy to install. Make sure you caulk them to make them air tight. If you are not mechanically inclined you may screw up their operation though. I have used them on buildings but I have seen people to stupid to shut them properly, sometimes haveing the bottom pane on the top or the top only half shut. I, my self, removed my storm windows and installed thermopane replacement double glazed windows with screens which I like better. A little more cost. (actually a lot more cost).
--
If I wasn't me I wouldn't like me either.
Signature file not found
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
LSMFT wrote:

Uh, no, at least in my experience. No storm is completely air-tight, especially after it gets a few years on it. You want weep holes on the bottom so condensation can drain out. Previous Owner of this place potted the northern-exposure storms with silicone. The gap between window and storms had lots of black mold growing. One storm was so bad I had to replace it- the el-cheapo replacement came with preformed weep slots on the bottom edge. After four years, not a trace of mold in the new window.
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/video/0,,20052892,00.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Consider the cost of installing the storms.
Then consider the cost of replacing the windows themselves.
Yes, the cost for new windows will be higher.
Now, consider the inconvenience of opening and closing the windows with the addition of the storms, especially windows that are obstructed by furniture.
I got so sick and tired of trying the raising the storms and lowering the screens on nice days, then reversing the process on cool days or when I wanted the AC on, etc. My storms/screens required 2 hands, making it next to impossible to use them on windows that were obstructed by beds, tables etc.
The huge convenience of being able to open the new windows with a single hand is well worth the cost of new windows, not even considering the overall increased efficiency.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've never heard of anybody manipulating their storms so frequently. Mostly it's storms down in the fall and storms up in the spring. (The screens are fixed in place. Makes it a royal pain to wash the windows.)
Although if we get a nice day in the winter, we might raise the storms a few inches and blow some fresh air through the house.
We've got fairly old Andersen windows, probably installed some time between 1985 and 1992.
Cindy Hamilton
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

re: "I've never heard of anybody manipulating their storms so frequently. Mostly it's storms down in the fall and storms up in the spring."
Can I assume you don't have central air?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, you cannot. We have central air. However, the storms stay up all summer anyway.
Cindy Hamilton
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

So I gotta ask...
Are you throwing money away for the sake of convenience?
Don't take that the wrong way...it's a serious question. Why do you run your AC with the storms up?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

"Up", as in the "up position" or "up", as in "installed"?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Cindy originally said:
"Mostly it's storms down in the fall and storms up in the spring. "
I take that to mean "Up", as in the "up position", since the response was related to my comments about raising and lowering the storms/ screens based on the weather.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think you're talking past each other, was my point.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a serious question for you:
Why do you waste hours fumbling with the storms to save a few pennies on electricity during the summer cooling season?
First off you're trying to maintain a much larger temperature differential, over 50 degrees, in winter versus 20 degrees or less in summer.
In other words, trying to keep a house at 68 degrees when its 0 outside is a lot harder than trying to keep the house at 72 degrees when it's 90 outside. In winter the marginal additional insulating value you get from storms makes a significant difference but in summer it does not make nearly the difference.
Second off, you're using a much more expensive fuel in winter (gas/ oil) versus relatively cheap electricity in the summer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On May 26, 2:13pm, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

Huh? "Cheap electricity?" "Expensive gas"? What planet?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.