Storing Construction Lumber

I picked up about 40 2x4's on sale today. The intent is to use them to finish my basement at some point in the future. They were too good of a deal to pass up, but I won't finishing my basement for some time to come.
So I intend to just stack them and store them in the basement. Is there anything special I should do like set them on cleats or strap the stack to prevent warping? The basement is clean, dry and heated / cooled.
Thanks! J.A.
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Yep, exactly. Set them up on some wood blocks so the bottom boards are dead flat. It's probably not necessary to sticker them if they're already dry and the basement is conditioned. Strapping them isn't a bad idea - ratchet tie-downs would be nice, or you could weight down the top with concrete block.
R
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they will dry futher in your basement, and likely warp.
on a good note they will make excellent fire wood...........
lumber sold today is grown quicly in a farm like arangement, look at the growth rings they are BIG, this makes the lumber much less stable
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wrote:

they will dry futher in your basement, and likely warp.
on a good note they will make excellent fire wood...........
NOT! Pine, spruce, and other soft woods are full of tars and gums that could potentially cause a chimney fire.
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lay down 3 strips of narrow, same thickness, strips (stickers) - center, and about 18" from the ends. lay down 6 boards lay down another 3 strips and so on that will get you a stack about 7 high
place some good weight on top of the stack, but allow good airflow.
I'd sticker them because today's wood is generally green.
If not already, paint over the ends to seal then up.
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BS. That is an 'old wives tale'. Most times the ones who spread that crap is someone who has never burned any and never knew anyone who did. I would bet you don't even burn hardwood and further don't know anyone who does. If it were true noone would be able to heat with wood in over 1/2 the states and for sure all of Alaska and most of Canada. Cured softwood is no more dangerous to burn than hardwood. Clean the chimney at the beginning of the season, burn correctly and don't worry aobut it. If paranoid, clean chimney again about the middle of the heating season.
Harry K.
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wrote:

BS. That is an 'old wives tale'. Most times the ones who spread that crap is someone who has never burned any and never knew anyone who did. I would bet you don't even burn hardwood and further don't know anyone who does.
I have been burning seasoned oak in two fireplaces for over 30 years. I clean the chimneys every fall beore the cold weather arrives. I know of three neighbors who have had chimney fires because they were burning a mix of seasoned and unseasoned pine and failed to maintain their fireplaces.
If it were true noone
what the hell is 'noone'?
would be able to heat with wood in over 1/2 the states and for sure all of Alaska and most of Canada. Cured softwood is no more dangerous to burn than hardwood. Clean the chimney at the beginning of the season, burn correctly and don't worry about it. If paranoid, clean chimney again about the middle of the heating season.
I'm sure there are many who are not aware of the need for proper maintenance of their fireplaces and the fact that softwoods contain resins that do not 'go away' with seasoning. Much of the resin crystallizes and remains in the wood. Ever hear of 'lighter' wood or 'torch' wood? They refer to softwoods that contain enough resin to burn like candles. I have stacks of it many years old that I use for kindling.
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Ah! A spelling flame!.
BTW. repeating BS does not make it valid. That people have chimney fires because they do not maintain them...
Again. it is BS. There is _some_ validity to it if one burns _unseasoned_ pine, fir, spruce, etc.
Harry K
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I wrote: "if they're already dry" - seems to me that's pretty clear terminology.

You're jumping the gun. If the OP has reasonably dry lumber to start, puts them in conditioned space, and restrains them from moving, where's the problem? He's going to be using them for framing out a basement, not making furniture.

Of course newer lumber is less desirable, but maybe the OP lucked out and discovered some "NOS" 2xs. ;)
R
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After reading here, I think I'll stack it in a neat pile on some shorter scraps of wood, and bind it with ratchet-straps at the ends and in the middle. Hopefully warpage will be minimal.
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That's all you need and really all you can do. Good luck with the basement.
R
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I really believe you need spacers in between. Otherwise the outer boards will absorb and/or release moisture unevenly and that is very likely to cause warping. Stacking the boards together is also likely to cause mold to grow between them. Good air circulation and support will give the best results.
Don Young
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