Storing an old carburator

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On Wed, 25 May 2011 08:38:56 -0500, dpb wrote:

Ahh, this is just the screw holding the stop / idle speed adjustment which sits externally to the carb - whether the throttle plate screws (although I think it might only have one, without going to look) are also snafu is another matter :-) I don't think I could get the stop off without completely trashing it, but it shouldn't be too hard to make something functionally equivalent anyway.

Yes, that'd be my worry, too, getting it all aligned properly.

Yep, same deal here. Maybe drilling slightly larger than needed and then epoxying the new sleeves in place (using some kind of rig to keep it aligned while drying) might work. Modern epoxies seem to be pretty robust - I even filled some quite serious scoring in the cylinder bore of my "junk" engine with the stuff, and so far it's taking the oil and heat and having piston rings sliding past it just fine (I tried it more for chuckles than anything, but it's really surprised me how well it's holding up). If it can take that kind of abuse, it'd likely last in a carb body, too.

Yeah, I don't think that whatever metal they're cast from is particularly hard, so I'm not surprised that they wear long before the shafts do. But then 25 years isn't bad for something that was probably only designed to last a fraction of that, either.
cheers
Jules
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On Thu, 26 May 2011 00:13:55 +0000 (UTC), Jules Richardson

The carb bodies are "generally" die cast zinc. The best way to re-bush one is to take a good one and fixture it on the mill, using an end-mill, reamer, or transfer punch as a locator, then put the old carb in the fixture with a larger end mill or reamer, then press in new bushings and mill/ream back to proper size , again in the fixture.
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On 5/25/2011 8:20 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: ...

All of this has one thing in that I've previously mentioned lacking..."mill" :)
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If you have a "tight" drillpress you can do the same. Cutting zinc is not terribly hard. The secret is in the "fixturing" to hold the carb rigidly square to the cutter and accurately in position.
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On 5/25/2011 9:15 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: ...

From previous posting...

I do suspect could manage if really gave it a try but so far it's been possible to find a replacement (although the last one may have been the end of line on new replacements for that particular model; it was only a new old-stock happen to find distributor w/ a couple still on hand that saved having to do something different then and that's been several years now)...
As long as it's close enough the throttle plate shaft doesn't bind and the throttle plate ends up reasonable well centered in the throat, it's not terribly critical. Hitting "pretty near" center would be ok.
--
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On Mon, 23 May 2011 09:35:52 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

I've done this with automotive carbs. I hosed them out good with spray carb cleaner, let them dry thoroughly, then stored them in a closed up cardboard box so they stay clean. FWIW YMMV
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