storing a 12 volt battery

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They are wrong. When I was a kid, my dad had a place on a wooden shelf for storing the extra battery. NEVER store it on the concrete floor I was told. Well, I of course knew it all, and the floor was a better spot, as I had something else I wanted to put on the wooden shelf. Dad was right. Sure enough, I dropped a big wrench on the battery, shorting it out with big sparks aflyin! The battery discharged of course. So, NEVER store a battery on a concrete floor!
(In the olden days, the battery case was made of different material, and it could discharge through the case, more so if on a concrete floor. Them days are long gone.)
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On 09/09/2015 04:09 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:

You can buy it a battery blanket so it doesn't shiver
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
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On 9/9/2015 12:47 PM, herb white wrote:

Why will it take you two years to scrap the lawnmower? Why so you want to preserve the battery for that period of time (instead of discarding it or putting it to use in some *other* device before the mower is scrapped)?
How much do you have invested in the battery? I.e., is it really *worth* anything to that (yet unnamed) potential future use?
Is the battery sealed/"maintenance free"? If you can drain the electrolyte ("acid") from the cells and store it *separately*, you can preserve the battery almost indefinitely. Then, refill it and use it immediately.
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In my experience, batteries deteriorate. Draining and storing the electrolyte separately would be a good way to prevent that.
If the battery is a 12 Volt Gel Cell, I suggest keeping it connected to a "Battery Tender Plus" when not in use. It will maintain an unused battery for an extended period, but not forever.
You might be surprised how much some Gel Cell batteries cost. My Honda generator uses a Yuasa battery that is also used in some motorcycles. I found one at a Yamaha motorcycle shop for half the Honda price, but it was still expensive!
Fred
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On 9/9/2015 2:20 PM, Fred McKenzie wrote:

IME, many "tenders" are cheaply designed -- little more than a transformer and a diode (counting on the transformer windings to limit current). As line voltage fluctuates, so will the output "float" voltage of such a device. "Overcharging" is a surefire way of toasting a battery prematurely. Unless *you* (or the circuit) are carefully monitoring the *actual* voltage, all bets are off.
["batteries" are notoriously hard to charge as you tend to only be dealing with two terminals (by definition, a battery is more than once *cell*). So, if any single cell goes wonky, the charging algorithm for the entire battery is faulted.]

Ever buy SLA's for a powerchair? :>
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On Wed, 09 Sep 2015 13:16:51 -0700, Don Y

Letting the plates dry out can be a good way to totally screw up the battery. It's not quite like a new "dry charged" battery
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On 9/9/2015 3:47 PM, herb white wrote:

>

Remove the battery from the machine. Store it in a cool cellar, which does not freeze. Sit the battery on wood, not cement floor.
Might want to put the purchase receipt in a plastic Ziploc or similar bag, and store near (but not touching) the battery.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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The reason not to put/store a battery on a concrete floor is that the acid from the battery will destroy the concrete!! Basic chemistry here.
"Olden days" batteries were prone to develop leaks and if stored on wood shelving, the wood would absorb the leaking acid preventing damage to more important things like a concrete floor.
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snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Where I worked thirty years ago, there were large banks of batteries in glass cases. As the result of some employees coming to work and finding acid on their desks from batteries on the floor above, a "tray" was installed that was large enough to contain a battery's contents.
The best material for such a tray is probably fiberglass, although a falling battery would probably fracture it. Someone in a high position decided that they had to be made of stainless steel, which also reacts with battery acid. To satisfy that requirement, it was necessary to paint the stainless with a thick coat of acid-resistance paint.
Last I heard, they had converted to some kind of sealed battery.
Fred
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