Store aluminum ladder outdoors?

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On Oct 20, 3:42 pm, Jules Richardson

In the states we have an extremely technical term for that type of building:
We call it "a shed without a door". ;-)
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On Thu, 20 Oct 2011 12:48:23 -0700, DerbyDad03 wrote:

ha ha! :-) Filed away for future reference... ;)
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On 10/20/2011 3:48 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I always heard them called tractor sheds.
Much like carports, really, since the walls usually don't go down to grade level.
--
aem sends....


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wrote:

Around here even the "driving shed" or "drive-in shed" has doors. Otherwize you'd need to dig out the tractor before you could use it to blow out the lane.
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On Oct 21, 12:12 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Around here they are positioned with the open side downwind of the prevailing. They used to be seen at almost every farmstead, now only at old ones. My woodshed is built on that pattern, open on N side, "eyebrow" over it. Never have more than a skift of snow on the exposed face of the wood and I have had to dig a path through 2' of snow to get to the shed.
Harry K
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On Oct 20, 12:42 pm, Jules Richardson

Made perfect sense to me and I'm just an old farm boy from the mountains of Idaho.
Harry K
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wrote:

The boots are for if the ends are leaning against the structure. You should always have the rungs _above_ the gutter if cleaning gutters. Having the end of the ladder against the gutter, is a disaster waiting to happen. In other words, the boots are pretty much useless when cleaning gutters.
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After a little bit of practice you can uses a 28' ladder to hammer the gutter spikes back in if they pop out as you move the ladder along the gutter.
DAMHIKT
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On Thu, 20 Oct 2011 16:33:49 +0000 (UTC), Jules Richardson

A hoop of EMT on the top that rests on the roof keeps the ladder off the gutter. A carpeded wooden box tht slides onto the top of the ladder and bungies to the top rung protects the siding when I need to put the ladder against the wall
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On Oct 20, 1:01 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Andy comments
That is a damn good idea. Thanks for posting it... I'm gonna definitelly give that idea a try
Maybe a cardboard box to slip over the ends instead of the carpeted wood box...... I'll figure it out.... The local Moslem liquor store throws them out every day of about the right shape....
You are a genius !!!
:>)))) Andy in Eureka, Texas PE
PS The comment someone made about the ladder being higher than the gutter, for safety, is a very good one.....
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wrote:

Might want to try rubber pipe insulation. It's cheap enough & already split for slipping over the ladder.
I used it for protection on my aluminum ladder rack, which is over my truck cap. I used to haul aluminum ladders, and with the aluminum rubbing the aluminum rack, the rack starting wearing. Didn't any more after I put the pipe insulation on. Similar to this: http://www.homedepot.com/Plumbing-Pipe-Insulation/h_d1/N-buy9Z5yc1v/R-100585113/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053
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Andy wrote:

Fiberglass ladder?
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4ax.com:

I keep a 28' ladder in my garage along a wall. I stack 2 cinder blocks under both ends, lay the ladder down flat on them and cover with a couple of long boards. Makes for a great storage shelf! Downside is you have to empty the shelf to use the ladder. TomC
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I used to hang my 28' on a wall in my garage until I bought a 10' aluminum step ladder.
Now the step ladder is hanging in the garage and the 28' is hanging under the deck, under a small "roof" overhang to keep it clean/dry.
No room on the garage floor due to storage on one side and the dogs' crates and the freezer on the other.
BTW...I bought the 10' Werner (essentially brand new) on eBay for $60. Brand new, the ladder sells for ~$180. It was pick-up only about 350 miles from my house, but less than 30 miles from my Mom's house. I paid the guy via eBay and he agreed to hold it for a month until I went to visit Mom for Christmas.
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Why not screw some shelf brackets into the studs and hang the ladder on the wall?
With a few more cinder blocks you could keep the shelf on the floor, but you wouldn't have to move anything to use the ladder.
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Ηinder block wall with propane and ac lines along it.

With the end stacked blocks (32" high) under each end, I have open storage underneath the ladder. Lots of light weight stuff on top and heavy stuff underneath. And, having only to use it once every other year is not a big problem; the area needs a good sweeping by then anyway.
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Yep. I used to keep mine inside the garage hanging on the wall. Problem was other stuff got hung on top of the ladder, etc. Finally decided hanging under the eaves behind the garage was much saner.
Harry K
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I leave all three of mine outdoors. Other than the rope rotting, and the plastic on the pulleys if there are plastic pulleys, they wear well. I would just place them somewhere they are somewhat protected, and you don't have to dig through the snow to get at it.
Steve
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I would agree with everything except that part about putting where you don't have to dig it out of the snow. I would want it exactly where I would have to dig it out of the snow. I can't think of a reason why I would want to get on a ladder when it is that cold out, so any excuse I can use is a good one (g)>
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On 10/20/2011 7:50 AM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

winter storm blowing a hole in the roof that you want to cover?
hanging the xmas lights at last minute, or taking them down in jan?
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