Storage Shed Construction

I have been checking on storage shed kits at Home Depot. Tuff Sheds run up to $3000 for the shed and that includes delivery and construction and painting. A kit containing most of what you need except the roofing felt and shingles and a few other parts runs in the neighborhood of $1300. This is for an 8' X 12' shed with kind of a barn shape for more room in the top area. Does anyone know if, in general it would be a lot cheaper to buy a plan and do all the lumber and hardware purchase from standard sizes than to use one of these shed kits? Anybody else's experience with this sort of thing would be appreciated.
Huey
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GO BIGGER! You will wish its bigger!!!
I bought the seperate parts it saved some bucks.
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On Sat, 5 Aug 2006 14:07:26 -0700, "Huey Barnett"

Check your local papers and flyers and greensheets. Those guys that build a shed for less than a thousand bucks, generally do a really good job. I've seen their work up close and am always amazed at how well the sheds are constructed.
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On Sat, 5 Aug 2006 14:07:26 -0700, "Huey Barnett"

It's almost always cheaper to build it from scratch, and if you got some spare or used lumber laying around it might be cheaper yet. Unless you want something real fancy, you dont need plans. Just nail 2x4 studs to a top and bottom 2x4 plate. Space them 24 inches on center. Plywood is 4x8 foot sheets. If you keep the walls even 4 foot increments, nail the sheets to the wall frames. Make 4 of them, be sure to put a door on at least one or you wont be able to get inside (that would suck). Add a window if you want. The roof can be a little trickier, but not all that tough on a small shed. Just space all timbers 24 inches apart on everything. You floor is built the same way, unless you want a concrete floor. However, you might want to space the floor joists 16 inches on center, and use at least a 2x6. Use treated lumber for the floor and probably treated plywood too. Get a book on basic construction. Its really not that tough to make a small shed.
First make the floor or pour the concrete if you use that. Build the walls on the ground and stand them up onto the floor, and nail them down (temporary bracing helps). Once all walls are in place, you should be pretty good at building, and the roof will become easier.
Hope this helps.
By the way, I like this site...... This guy builds everything from free pallets.... I have done things similar.... http://summerville-novascotia.com/PalletShed
Mark
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Why not just buy one of those big construction plastic sheds from Sam's club or Costco?
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the wood pallet fellow has got a big problem, his pallet floor will rot fast, as anyone who left a pallet in a wet area will know
most pallets are low grade wood thats not rot or bug resistant. I guess its ok as long as he doesnt mind rebuilding every few years:(
plastic shed way easier
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wrote:

If they contact the ground, you are right, but not if they are on blocks or something. I have built with pallets and some wood is poor, other is good, but no wood should ever directly contact the ground unless it's treated. Actually, if I was to build that same pallet shed, I'd make the floor from treated lumber or pour a concrete slab. Then the rest of the shed would be from pallets and painted like he did on the website.
Plastic shed..... YECHHHHHH. Besides ugly, hope the wind dont get it, and either way, the sun will degrade the plastic in a few years and it will be replacement time.
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

Because many (most) people want something that has similar construction to and fits in with a house.
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George wrote:

sheds arent permanent structures, and many dont match the home anyway.
my home is brick my shed T 11:(
Nop way I could afford a brick shed.
with lumber prices today the 800 buck sams shed will be a bargain and put up in just a day saving lots of work.........
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

'Cause they cost $800 - $1000+.
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My shed: http://www.flickr.com/photos/joearnold / Purchased for $1200 delivered and tied down. 8' X 12', 4' door. 5/8" T-111, pressure treated 2X6 floor joists & 4X6 skids, 3/4" treated plywood floor. 2X4 studs, 16" O/C. 20 year asphalt shingles & ridge vent. I added the gable end window, and later the front work area, wiring and plumbing. All told, about $1600 invested. Click on the small pics, then click on 'all sizes'.
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