Storage Shed Anchoring?

I recently purchased one of those small (8x10) steel storage shed kits from the local home improvement warehouse type place here. I'm not sure how much anchoring I need for it. The instructions simply say "this shed must be anchored", and they provide instructions for anchoring it to bare ground using cable anchors, anchoring it to wood posts, or to a concrete foundation, using their concrete anchors.
I have constructed a foundation/floor for it by building an 8x12 frame out of 2x4 treated lumber (I made the foundation 2 feet longer so I could stack my firewood on it as well), covered with 1/2" treated plywood. The shed is securely attached to this foundation by a 2 1/2" screw at every mounting hole, however the foundation itself is not anchored. The shed is also nestled in to a wooded area, between trees and our house, so it is somewhat shielded from wind.
Photo at: http://www.nullmodem.org/shed /
So my question is, do I need to provide additional anchoring beyond attaching it to the foundation? My thinking is that the weight of the shed, the foundation, the firewood pile, and the shed's contents are now all contributing to holding it in place, so probably not. The shed itself weighs only a few hundred pounds, but the combination of all of the above comes in at at least 1,000 - 1,500 pounds (there's an old riding mower in there, a regular mower, several snowblowers, etc... it's packed pretty full.) Frankly, if we got strong enough winds to worry about, I think they would more likely tear the shed apart before tipping it or moving it. Then again, the cable anchors that can be purchased separately are rated at 2,000 pounds, so I'm not 100% sure.
Yes, I realize I could just go ahead and add cable anchors as well, "extra protection won't hurt", but I'd prefer not to spend the money if they really aren't necessary. Yeah, they're only about 30 bucks, but times are tight, and $30 is $30. I've already spent way too much on this project as it is, but I needed to get all this junk out of my garage. :-)
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- Jeff

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Jeff Morris wrote:
(Snip)

You should be fine. The weight of that wooden platofrm alone should keep it from going airborn, even if it was empty. And as you say, everything -in- the shed is now holding down the platform. Save your $30.
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I agree. The engineers that design those things are not nearly as smart and you and I. They just want to bleed a few more bucks from the consumer. Those storms they sow on the news are just Hollywood stuff to get ratings. Nobody actually gets wind damage.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Just the kind from anal retentive overly cautious people who let fear run their lives.
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It depends if it is in a sheltered area and what you store in it. They say to anchor it figuring it can be empty. Its up to you , in a open field area yes or an area with wind empty it will blow away .
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m Ransley wrote:

I'm counting on that few hundred pounds of Wolmanized wood screwed to the bottom for a little help. "Cautious Charlie" who replied before mentioned wind moving a boat, but yeah, that's what we *want* to happen, we diesign the boat so it glides through the water with a little wind in the sails. We're talking preventing a trip to Oz in the other case. The wood deck is *fighting* movement by gravity and friction.
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A wood deck would do it for most but often I get 50 - 60 mph gusts across a lake in front. Mine is in back sheltered , 100 mph wind wont move it and I didnt bolt it down. Its a cheap shed, the lawyers have to cover themselves. one of those may blow away to pieces bolted down in a 60 mph gust, who knows.
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I've driven around a couple of houses that were blown into the street. This was at the New Jersey shore after a storm. Codes have changed requiring better anchoring, but buildings can and do blow away.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

You might be right about that and I speak from the perspective of an engineer by degree(s) and practice. I heard that a fellow did a PhD thesis in Mechanical Engineering to find out why all the standard design handbooks called for 4x over design in the strength of materials used for loading docks. Why? Well, nothing in the math could explain it, but all the seasoned "engineers" said that if the 4x factor were not used, the loading docks would collapse. In the end then found it was because trucks were backing into the docks, not the weight of stuff on the dock.
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Look at the surface area of the side. Look at the suface area of a sial that iscapable of moving a boat. Getting the idea? If not convinced, look at some news footage of thunderstorms, hurricanes, etc. That 30 bucks invested now can save you hundreds later.
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wrote:

Some localities have codes that require "portable" buildings to be tied down. At least check to see if you need the anchors to meet local codes.
Barry
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-snip-

If I remember right-- and it's been 30 years since I had one of those things, the anchors attach to the top plate, below the roof. That's the only thing I would consider.
Attach cables of your own design, or the $30 ones, to keep the walls intact. They will not only hold it down, but prevent lateral twisting which will bend the panels & tear out the screws.
Jim
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