Stoppiing leak in plastic plumbing pipe


I have a small leak at a glued connection of two pvc plumbing pipes that are located horizontally under my kitchen sink. I would like to stop the leak without having to take apart the pipes,etc,etc.
Any suggestions(plumbers goop,etc) on how to successfully do this would be most appreciated.
Thank you,
Bob
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Bob wrote:

The only answer I know is to cut out the leaking part and replace it.
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Joseph Meehan

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Plumbing though, does mean a lot of things, such as drains and supply lines with pressure.
You may get away with some sealer on a drain, but not on a supply Sometimes you just have to do the job right. Anything less may result in a worse leak that usually happens when you are away for the weekend.
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Agreed, ONLY on drain. I've tossed 100% silicone on tiny ones absolutely making sure the drain did not get used overnight. Then, on black pipe, a dab of roofing cement has worked :-) This is cheating with a hack twist.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Good point. I had assumed it was a pressure pipe, but it may not be.
As for those who have suggested methods to fix a pressure pipe, I would not trust one inside a wall or anywhere a leak would be a problem. It is just too easy to replace it properly.
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PVC pipe is glued with a solvent that actually dissolves the surface. If the leak is small and you can get it dry, you might try putting some primer and glue around the joint. I haven't tried this and would probably not do it myself (fearing that it will just make it worse), but it is worth a try if you can't cut it out.
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wrotF:

I had the same problem with a toilet drain under the 1st floor and in the basement. I found that Home Depot carries a special black plumbers tape ... it looks like electrical tape, that stretches and adheres to itself.
I dried the pipe thoroughly, then wrapped the pipe tightly with all the tape on the spool, about 6' of it. That was 3 months ago. So far, it's still dry. But I don't know if this is a long-term solution.
I tried silicone sealer first, but the water seemed to leak under it and I had to pull it all off. So I wouldn't recommend that route.
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are
If you can somehow create a vacuum in the pipe, it will suck PVC cement applied to the leak into the leak and may seal it. Get it dry first. This has worked for me on low pressure leaks. YMMV.
Bob
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wrote:

Duct tape and a couple of hose clamps will work for a two week camping event. Dunno about long term though. Why the phobia about cutting into the pipe?
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