Stock up on Fuses BEFORE the Holiday

If your house still has Fuses, Stock up on Fuses BEFORE the Holiday!
I'm posting this because I have a vivid memory of going to visit my uncle, when I was around 10 years old. A fuse blew in his panel. He did not have any spare fuses, and all the stores were closed. So, he put a penny behind the fuse. I watched him do it, and even at my young age, I thought that was dangerous. A little while later there was smoke coming out of the fuse box. so the main was shut off. We spent the next few hours of that holiday using candles, and it was getting cold in the house because the furnace needed electricity.
My other uncle was an electrician, but he was at some other party. He had to make a special trip to repair the damages, and I still remember the electrician uncle calling the other uncle an idiot for doing that. I know the repair involved replacing some burnt wires and maybe more. I watched him doing the work and saw the charred wires. But the electrician was able to temporarily get power to most of the house and get the heat working. (I suppose he just disconnected the burnt wires from the circuit that overloaded).
Anyhow, this was probably over 40 years ago, but I still remember it vividly. So, if you have a fuse box, stock up on fuses BEFORE the holiday, After all, you'll be using a lot more power than normal, since it's a holiday. More lights, holiday decorations, and very likely an electric roaster, which are huge energy users.
And of course the stores will be closed......
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On 12/27/2014 3:10 PM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

I'm sure each of us has a "stock up on" memory, or three. Years ago, my sister told of how she and family planned a trip out of town, on the holiday. They live in a small town with one grocery store. Of course, the flight was cancel, and they all came home in the car. She buys groceries as needed, so they came home to no food and no stores open. I'll have to ask some day for her to retell that, I don't remember what they did for food.
At least one year has been colder than planned, ran out of firewood. And the furnace is all electric.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Saturday, December 27, 2014 3:11:25 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

upgrade to breakers, adding safety, convenience, plus homes that still have fuses are near impossible to sell, you cant get homewners insurance on homes that still have breakers
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wrote:

While I agree about switching to breakers, my parents house was sold after my mother passed on. They still had fuses. The house sold for a fair price and sold within a week of listing it. She had insurance too. While they were still alive, I offerred many times to change their panel, (for free) but they didn't want to pay for the parts. They had one of the old 60A mains, with 4 fuses and a range pullout. When my uncle who was an electrician was still alive, he added a breaker panel next to the fuse box, with 4 extra breakers. That was added when dad built a garage, and made a room in the attic. Changing that panel would have been real simple since almost everything from the whole house came in thru one 3/4" EMT conduit, and another of them for the addon breaker panel.
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On Sun, 28 Dec 2014 13:45:31 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

or more. Can't insure with a 60 amp service - and no K&T wiring. Aluminum is OK with an inspection certificate.
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Our daughter bought a house in Macom, IL, about 15 years ago that still had knob and tube wiring throughout the house. I questioned the realtor about the K&T and was told it was perfectly acceptable. Also checked the insura nce company and they had no problem insuring it. Don't know what the siuat ion would be today. K&T is/was not inherently dangerous if the fuse/circuit breakers were properly sized and if no one messed with the wiring.
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On 12/28/2014 7:14 PM, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

A small unused storage room and an attic in part of our building at work had K&T. Property insurance company made ut take it out about 4 years ago. They wanted some other work done too but the other stuff was otional.
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On Sun, 28 Dec 2014 16:23:39 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

You mean that if it's an old home with K&T wiring, the whole place has to be rewired? That could be a huge expense, and require lots of wall damage. Although the wire is that old cloth covered stuff, K&T was one of the safest wiring ever used.
Yet, they allow aluminum???? What a joke! I've seen more burnt aluminum wires at receptacles and in panels than I've ever seen with copper. (Mostly older trailer homes), and know of one ne trailer that started on fire from alum wiring, but luckily the owner was able to put out the fire and only ended up with a one and a half foot hole in their paneling around the outlet. He was a neighbor and he asked me to fix it. I told him I'd fix the paneling, but wont touch that wiring, unless he wants to replace all the aluminum. That would have pretty much involved putting wire-mold all over the house, because those trailers are are too hard to fish wires thru.
He did have an electrician come who replaced just that one line, using wire-mold, and left the rest of the aluminum.
I'd rather have K&T than aluminum wiring any day!
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On Sun, 28 Dec 2014 16:14:58 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net"

realtor about the K&T and was told it was perfectly acceptable. Also checked the insurance company and they had no problem insuring it. Don't know what the siuation would be today. K&T is/was not inherently dangerous if the fuse/circuit breakers were properly sized and if no one messed with the wiring.
--

If you look at how it was made, all the wires went thru porcelin
insulators where they went thru wood or were attached to porcelin
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On Sun, 28 Dec 2014 18:17:52 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

I fully agree that unmolested K&T wiring is very safe - but show me a house old enough to have K&T that has not been tampered with. Add to that the fact the K&T wired homes were not wired to handle today's electrical loads.

all wiring devices are either CoALR or properly pigtailed to copper. Properly installed second generation aluminum wiring is perfectly safe

constructed to MUCH lower standards than "permanent" homes. Not to mention they are generally inhabitted by lower income occupants who are more likely to cut corners and hire unqualified workers to do repairs and renovations, and are often located in areas where trades certification and inspection are more lax.

And I'd rather have a real house than a "redneck bungalow". I've done enough work on my brother's trailer and know how poorly they are built and how hard they are to work on. He's moving out of the trailer into his newly constructed home in the next month or so.
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K&T homes can be sold, just like homes with fuses can be sold.
The problem is no homeowners insurance company will risk insuring it. Homeo wners companies often send a inspector looking for obvious saftety hazards, like unven sidewalks. Without homeowners coverage you cant get a mortage. People want low cost insurance...
A killer issue with K&T it was never designed to be insulated and who today doesnt want insulation?
cover with nsulation and you have a major fire hazard:(
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On Sun, 28 Dec 2014 19:36:43 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

K&T wiring. One major problem with K&T was the junctions were made wherever the junction was required, with no boxes used. Early K&T installations used surface mounted switches and outlets, with the wired poked through the plaster and fasted to the switched, with the switches screwed to the plaster lathe. Some early K&T was also "ring" wired, with both ends of one wire connected to the fuse, and both ends of the other wire connected to neutral/ground. This split the load, effectively almost doubling the capacity of the 14 or 12 guage wiring. Many were initially also only 30 amp services - later upgraded to 60 amps - with 2 or 4 circuits respectively. Our first house had a 30 amp service (110 volt only) and only a drop-cord light in each room and 2 outlets. Many houses wired that way had other outlets added using K&T wiring, and extra circuits added when upgraded to 6a amp 220.
Then "romex" wiring was tapped in, with the connections soldered free-style wherever required without junction boxes. This is where the problems with K&T wiring get serious.
Being an electrician, Dad rewired the entire house with grounded Romex and a 125 amp service to support the use of some electric heating, as well as the installation of an oil fired forced air furnace, an electric range, etc.
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On 12/29/2014 12:02 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I can't imagine what a breaker panel would look like with 30 circuits of ring wired K&T.
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wrote:

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On Mon, 29 Dec 2014 08:44:10 -0500, Fred

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