sticky iron

I dropped a hot iron on a synthetic carpet. Before I could pick it up, some of the fiber stuck to the ironing surface. Now too sticky to use. How can I clean up?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have the same problem when a certain individual (who shall go unnamed, for my own safety) in my house cranks up the iron to its highest setting and then irons synthetic fabrics. Within 2-3 uses, the iron's all brown and won't glide across clothing. Rowenta, the iron manufacturer, makes a cleaning kit that works like a charm. The functional part of the kit is a tube of cream. You put an inch or two of it on a clean, white all-cotton towel, turn the iron to "high", and iron over the cream. The towel ends up brown and the iron ends up clean. It sometimes takes more than one application if the iron is REALLY messed up. Afterward, you aim the iron over a clean part of the towel and press the stream button so it blows any cleaner residue out of the holes. Finish with a Q-tip.
I got it at Bed, Bath & Beyond. Linens & Things might carry it, too, or check www.rowenta.com for a dealer in your area.

some
I
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hey, that worked thank you. A little different. Linens and Things and Target did not have. Bed, Bath & Beyond did not have the Rowenta kit but did have a product. It came in a small tube, not near enough for any thickness on the towel. It took a little extra effort to clean it up, but there was not enough stuff left to need the holes cleaned with Q-tips. Finished ironing the shirt I should have left alone and worn it unironned like I usually do. Let that be a lesson to me!

can
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Glad it worked. If you see the Rowenta kit someplace, buy it. Based on 3 uses so far, I'm guessing I'll get 10-15 more out of it. I only needed to squeeze out about twice as much as you'd put on a toothbrush. Apparently, when the iron hits it, the stuff liquifies, and as long as you keep the iron moving, the entire soleplate gets treated.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.