'stick-um' for a friction fit pulley?

I've got an old-ish [10yrs?] treadmill that I stuck in the outdoor gazebo for my morning walk when it rains or whatever.
Lately it started slipping a bit every so often. So I pull it apart & it looks like it is slipping where the drive pulley is pressed onto the 1 1/4" or so shaft that the walking belt rides on.
Did it get cold enough for the metal shaft to shrink more than the plastic pulley?
Do you think Loctite make a product that will make it grip, or is there a better product out there.
I've got nothing to lose-- this thing is long past paid for. I'm just trying to keep from tossing this one and picking up another.
Jim
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IIRC Loctite 680 is a gap filling product for slip fits.
Unfortunately some Loctites (242, 243 in particular) can degrade some plastics to the point of failure. I had this happen on some banana plug sockets using 243.
..........If you choose to use a Loctite product, make sure it won't attack the pulley material. Loctite makes a LOT of products, I sure they make one for your application. http://instantsolutions.loctite.com/CA_prodselectguide.pdf .............
Based on a visit to
http://www.henkelna.com
http://www.henkelna.com/cps/rde/xchg/henkel_us/hs.xsl/full-product-list-7932.htm?iname=Loctite+638+Retaining+Compound&countryCode=us&BU=industrial&parentredDotUID=productfinder,0000000I04,0000000389&redDotUID=0000000I04
Looks like Loctite 638 is the correct product; recommend for use with plastics & metals, high strength and decent gap filling (.010 max). Use their primer to speed up cure or wait a few days.
I'd guess that other phenomena are at work....... thermal coefficient of expansion for most plastics is greater than steel.
Does the pulley have enough meat to fit it with a set screw in the V?
cheers Bob
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Or a ringfeder?
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I think I'd try removing the shaft pulley/assembly, then separating the pulley from the shaft.
Then I'd roughen up & clean the area on the shaft where the pulley sits, and clean the pulley bore; then apply a thin coat of JB weld to both the shaft end and bore, replace the pulley back on the shaft clean up any squeeze-out, and set aside to cure overnight.
If the pulley is really a tight fit, you might need to figure a way to provide a dash of clearance for the JB Weld... your on your own there.
Good Luck!
Erik
PS, maybe 'spot' check a little JB Weld somewhere on the plastic pulley first to be sure nothing funny happens... E
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Thanks all. You guys are no help.<g> I had a few thoughts in my head when I posted-- and they were all covered in the responses. Great minds, I guess.
Decided to go with easiest first. I warmed it up real good with a heat lamp- and dribbled crazy glue around the circumference on both sides.
So far that seems to be doing the trick. We'll know better when it gets to 0F out there. Fingers crossed--
Thanks- Jim
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