Steps for installing a transfer switch

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In my case, I have a lot of circuits, most of which supply some important loads but draw very little current, like compact fluorescent lighting. So choosing only very few of them would inconvenience me greatly.
i
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Ignoramus20689 wrote:

I have a feeling I'm going to regret this, but here goes...
I too was concerned with the limited number of circuits available with typical, sub panel type transfer switches. I have a 16kw generator, and a 16 circuit sub panel type ATS. I have circuits that literally draw less than an amp or two in most situations, never more than 5 amps. I just wired them together in the main panel. Kind of rigged my 16 circuit sub panel into an ever expanding sub panel, probably 24 or more circuits are controlled now.
It's an automatic transfer switch, which I know you do not want, but I did the same thing last year when a hurricane hit and I had a 6 circuit manual switch. I had 6 circuits wired, but was using a fraction of the generator's power. At the time, I had a 7500 watt generator, and averaged about 2000 watts. So I added rooms as needed, with no ill effects.
FWIW it's a Generac 5244 generator and matched transfer switch. I thought about the service disconnect, whole house transfer switch, but I know my family cannot control their energy consumption. When breaking in my generator, my wife turned on the Advantium oven (microwave on steroids). It kept up, but only because the 5 ton AC was not running. And I cautioned about turning on lights when breaking in..........
Brad
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Ignoramus20689 wrote:

You have identified the correct switch. A two hundred ampere main breaker results in the need for a two hundred ampere transfer assembly. Be advised that a main breaker interlock kit will achieve the same result at far lower cost. What brand and model is your main breaker enclosure; such as your main distribution panel?
--
Tom Horne

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On Wed, 23 Aug 2006 19:41:48 GMT, Thomas D. Horne, FF EMT

ITE Gould. It accepts Homeline breakers for branch circuits.
i
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Most times a new sub panel is installed, those circuits fed by the generator are moved to it and the transfer switch is installed between the old panel and new.
Why would you want to run EVERYTHING? That's a helluva big generator needed.
Mostly critical loads, like lighting, refrigerator, freezer are put on a generator.
Marty
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if you power all circuits many will have minor l;oads like a light or two on steps.
you turn off all heavy unnecessary loads.
a bit more work during a outage but actually more flexible.........
better than finding a critical load isnt on a generator line.....
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Hello everyone: This is my first post to this group, and I've been following this thread. First, the NEC states that the conductors from the service entrance to the main breaker (not being fused) should be as short as practicable. Personally I would be very reluctant to install any equipment upstream of ANY breakers. Second, a sub-panel can be arbitrarily large, limited only by the maximum breaker size allowed in your main panel. If you know that you are not going to use certain loads, don't install them. Or move EVERYTHING over to the sub. You will stilll have the safety of a breaker ahead of everything, and you can take your monitor light off the main panel. Just my 2 cents.

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