Stepping off a ladder onto the roof

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drive some stakes in the ground and tie ladders base, then climb ladder and tie ladder at top, like using a C clamp on the gutter, tie ladder to c clamp.
DONT leave rope etc to catch your feet trip on!
its nice to know your ladder wouldnt blow down, that happened to a friend before he had a cell phone he was stuck on roof for hours
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I nailed a large nail into the roof and fastened a loop of 12gauge solid copper wire between it and a rung of the ladder. Just left the nail in for future use. Better safe than sorry.

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Eigenvector wrote:

inexperienced then you may never feel comfortable. Just be sure the ladder is safe by keeping its' pitch shallow and the bottom secure, as others have said. Then there will be no risk of kicking the ladder down. Have a long enough ladder to extend several feet above the roofline so you have somthing to grab. These things will increase your confidence. After that you just put one foot in from of the other, always moving forward. You always want to lean forward, never back. Keep your eyes on the roofline and your where your next step will fall.
When I was on the roofing crew we often had to carry bundles of shingles and other material up the ladder. When you have a 70lb bundle on your shoulder your concentration is increased dramatically and you instinctively understand that you must move forward. Usually I can just step off onto the roof and carry the bundle to the ridge. On steeper roofs you can unload the bundle onto the roof or to a waiting helper. then it can be carried to the peak to be stacked. On steeper pitched roofs we would nail a board to the roof next to the ladder to give a more secure foothold or place to put the bundle. This only works if you are tearing off the roof anyway.
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On Sun, 5 Nov 2006 13:53:47 -0800, "Eigenvector"

Consider where you put the ladder. Falling doesn't hurt. It's when you STOP falling. Would you rather stop on concrete or stop on grass?

Sometimes I wonder how much it would hurt to jump off a roof onto grass (like when you get on the roof and something happens to the ladder).

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I know a unfortunate fellow that fell off a 3rd story roof:( He fell and hit concrete, with no one around he dragged himself inside and called 911. He broke his back and was bleeding pretty bad, left blood trail on ground.
He survived after missing near a year of work and lots of surgery and painful rehab.
supringisly he still weorks on his home, painted it again this summer.
he lost soi much income being a project manager for building the pittsburgh airport his home will never recoop the money let alone the pain......
If I were him I would make the outside no maintence he sands and strips it constantly.
complete waste of effort if you ask me.
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trim that had come loose, but I couldn't do it. I simply couldn't get my foot to go up on the roof. I had to ask a friend to do it. When he did he disturbed some bees that were nesting under the molding; so there he is running across the roof flailing his arms around, and I can't even get up there. I felt so so, well I'm sure you know how I felt.
Mind you, I have climbed 1,000' cliffs in Yosemite, and been sky diving and hang gliding; but I can't go up on my roof.
Good luck; if you figure something out, let me know.
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actually mountain climb too, it took me a few trips to get used to navigating ledges, and free climbs are simply impossible, but like we all seem to be saying - taking that last step onto the roof seems to be impossible.
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trembling.
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Cut a hole in the roof, and install an openable skylight, and then mount one of those folding attic stairs.

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On Sun, 5 Nov 2006 13:53:47 -0800, "Eigenvector"

A step ladder is unstable in any user position other than being in-line with the ladder. I once was on the third step of a 6 foot step ladder and leaned to the side to remove an electrical cord hung on a nail. Before I knew it I was on the concrete floor yelling in pain. My hip took the fall. The ladder had flipped. It was 20 minutes before the pain subsided enough for me to get up. Fortunately no bones were broken. Run the possiblity of the ladder flipping through your head. Its not hard to imagine the sequence of events.
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Eigenvector wrote:

As others have said, make sure the ladder extends a few feet above the roofline to give you something to grab on to.
On my ladder the feet can be positioned so that they stick into the ground a couple inches, one end of them is spiky for that. Otherwise, to secure the bottom of the ladder, put a piece of 2X4 across behind it, then use stakes, spikes, short pieces of pipe, etc. to keep the 2X4 in place. If on asphalt you can drive masonry nails through the wood into the asphalt below. Or, prop the bottom of the ladder against something sturdy like the tire of your car (just make sure other family members don't drive it away then!). To secure the top of the ladder, put a C-clamp on the gutter and tie it to that (or one on each side).
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