Stepping off a ladder onto the roof

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or add a opening skylight, come on roof thru attic.
this should be REQUIRED in places like new orleans that can flood fast so someone trapped in a attic has a way out in a flood..........
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FWIW, I don't think the problem in NO was that the flooding was FAST, so much as it that, once the water's high enough to convince you you'd rather be on the roof, it's already too deep to go outside. And if you're going to mandate a roof hatch, are you going to mandate a little rubber raft, too? And little bottle of iodine tablets and two cans of spam?
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And suicide pills for when you realize that you can't wait forever to be rescued :-)
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wrote:

And a laptop computer with newsgroup access, in case you need more spam....... Such as "Work at home"..... That would give you something to eat and something to do while you drown. This laptop should also have web access to ebay, for bidding on plane tickets and fake memorbilia from the remains of your city.

If I was trapped in an attic that was flooding, I sure as hell would bust a hole thru the roof or gable end.. Some people just dont seem to have any common sense......
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Or in places (a) where houses have basements and (b) are located near a nuclear plant -- in case of meltdown (easily accomplished, apparantely, by eg driving boats into water intake valves if site is on river).
Why?
Well, with all the fallout, you can escape it only by lying on basement floor, where the path to ground surface goes through enough ground and subterrainian (sp?) rocks strongly dimishes the rays.
*EXCEPT* for the roof -- whatever falls up there will radiate down at you. So you have to get rid of that fallout.
How? With a hand-held leaf-blower -- given that you can get *onto* the roof (quickly!, on and off).
For that, some kind of trap-door onto the roof, from the attic, would be a help -- a big help.
Of course, the leaf-blower would have to be gasoline-powered (meltdown means no more electric power).
Early on, you'd go up there every hour or two, I guess, to blow the stuff off the roof.
David
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snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

I would suspect that a water sprinkler on the roof would wash the dust off easier & better and could be operated from the basement. You might need a battery operated pump, but there is a good chance water pressure will last longer than electricity.
--
Free men own guns - www.geocities/CapitolHill/5357/ (add .com after geocities)

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wrote:

My newest ladder has flared legs/feet on both ends; not like the picture, but the same idea.
-- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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Oren wrote:

Not really. The wider stance is more stable on the ground, and more stable leaning against a wall, but it doesn't make it any more stable when you're climbing onto a roof.
R
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wrote:

I agree. The flared legs can give a false sense of security. I like them best for my comfort. I have been known to stabilize my ladder with the bumper of my truck ( 28" ext on a slopped drive ). If I get shaky and I do I come down...<G> -- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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wrote:

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On Sun, 05 Nov 2006 19:40:11 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yo.house. wrote:

Maybe so, but I've tried that on the end of a 32' extension ladder, and it's too heavy to control. A aluminum stabalizer weighs about 1/3rd as much and only costs $20 or so.
While you're up there, before you move from the ladder to the roof, consider driving a screw-eye under the eve, and tying the ladder in place.
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stabilizer back when I was doing renos
My worst ladder nightmare: I used to install whirlybirds for a fixed price depending on roofing material. I learned after this to collect more information. I got a call to install a bird on a cedar roof so I gave the price and headed out in the morning. When I got to the house it was 3 stories up with a 5/12 pitch and on a hill. It had rained and it was windy. I needed a forty foot ladder just to get on the roof. A 20 foot ladder laid on the greasy cedar to get to the peak and a step ladder to sit on just to get to the other side of the roof to install the bird. Very slippery, and scary as hell.
I get up there with all my tools and the homeowner decides to go out in her yard with little kids and mow her lawn. If I drop a tool it could slide down the roof and kill someone. She can't hear me so back down the ladder around the house to tell her she can't be there. It was the scariest $60 bucks I ever earned.
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I think you not only feel that way, you DO have something to hold onto.
I think you not only have a sense of security, you actually do have more security when the ladder extends well above the roof line.
I mention this because in the last few months quite a few politicians and administrators have talked just the way you did here, except from a different perspective.
I heard more than one person on the radio saying that their goal, or the goal of the agency or part of an agency they administer, or the program they were voting for, that the goal was to give Americans a sense of security. They didn't say that they were improving our actual security, only our sense of security. It was very depressing**. You are not depressing, because you're talking about your own security or sense of it, not mine, and because you're evaluating, not discussing your goal.
**Depressing partly because of the way they talk, and partly because there are so many areas where security could be improved, ship cargo, for just one example.
So retrospectively you're downplaying how much benefit the tall ladder gives you; and that's probably a good thing, because you're recommending a tall ladder to others, but you don't want to promise to them, or even claim for yourself, more than you're sure of. You're not a liar.
But these politicians and administrators, whose job is to increase our actual security, not just our sense of it, have, if you accept what they say, downgraded their goals to increasing only our sense of security.

Try to roll when you fall.
IMO, that's not just about feeling better either. If the helper has his feet planted right at the base of the ladder and is leaning his weight on the ladder to keep it in place, you are safer.
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wrote:

I'm not really planning on falling, because landing on my head makes it hard to roll. Paratroopers are taught to roll when they land. This is a good point.

I help a friend with work now and then. He knows I hate ladder work, but we were putting up molding today on 16 ' ceilings.
His "policy" is that "if you fall, you are fired before you hit the ground (grin)" . -- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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On Sun, 5 Nov 2006 17:30:01 -0500, "Charles Schuler"

Not me!
"A man's got to know his limitations." Harry Callahan
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Charles Schuler wrote:

A good rule of thumb: With the ladder leaning on the house, stand on the ground with your toes against a ladder foot. Hold an arm out straight in front of you, parallel to the ground. If you fingers just touch the ladder, it is leaning at the proper angle. Otherwise, adjust the ladder angle and repeat.
Also be sure all four corners (two feet on the ground and two sides at the top) are firmly touching their surface without any rocking.
Finally, before climbing the ladder, test how sturdy it is. Be sure it doesn't rock or slide and the extension latches are properly set. Bounce a little on the first rung or two to confirm it stays put before climbing further.
Another safety note: Never lift the ladder up from the top (e.g. while you're on the roof)! People have killed themselves because they lift the ladder to move it or whatever, and release the extension latches. Then when they climb on to the ladder to start down, the ladder collapses.
Never take a ladder or its positioning for granted, whether you only use one once a year to clean your gutters, or you are a professional roofer. And look up for wires!
(Don't forget to tie your shoes and don't play with matches! :)
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Jim Taylor wrote:

Actually you do sometimes need to do this- but of course use a rope or something to connect the two sections. I have to do this to get from 1st floor to 2nd floor roof(ie haul ladder up), then lower ladder down again when going down.

Well said. I try to remind myself that my first concern is to stay alive, job is only #2.
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On Sun, 5 Nov 2006 13:53:47 -0800, "Eigenvector"

It's a lot easier to get on the roof than to get back on the ladder. Me, I stay off of ladders. <G> If it's higher than I am willing to fall, I hire somebody else.
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wrote:

No I refuse to give in. Maybe when I'm lying on my back in the hospital I'll give in but not before then. Like I say, I have to just visualize myself doing it.
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Eigenvector wrote:

You wear a pair of shoes with good grip. And extend the ladder higher so you have something to steady yourself. Or there is stabilizer, something like wings to attach to either side at the top of ladder.
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