steam radiators leaking

I've got 2 steam radiators that are leaking. I have tried JB Weld applied where I think the crack is, but I haven't removed the radiators to really look carefully. It worked for awhile, but they are both leaking again.
I've heard that radiators are easily removed. Hah. I have a bit of trouble with pipe wrenches, personally. So until I can find somebody to help me remove them so I can inspect and fix them properly (what IS the proper way?)--
does anybody know any quick & easy fixes? Like putting an egg in a car radiator, for example? Is there a product that can be added to the boiler water?
Barring that, where does one purchase new or used steam radiators?
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Where is the leak ?, vent , valve ? I woulnt put anything in the boiler, as steam systems have vents that close under temp and pressure.
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Many years ago I had a small crack near the bottom of one of our steam radiators. It is a two pipe system, and is very tight, ie., it has new valves, etc. At that time I let the system come up to temperature, and then as it cooled down, it begins to draw a partial vacuum, and I used some Liquid Iron (or was it Steel) in a tube, pushing it into the crack with the vacuum hopefully helping it to get in nicely. My spot was quite hard to reach, but: That particular crack had been leaking a little water, but since that time (about 25+ years ago!), it has been ok. What I did may or may not be any better than JB Weld, except that using the vacuum probably helped a lot. --Phil
Betsy wrote:

--
Phil Munro Dept of Electrical & Computer Engin
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@cc.ysu.edu Youngstown State University
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http://www.heatinghelp.com/newsletter.cfm?Id

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I had a crack in one of my radiators and couldn't find anything that would fix it, including several kinds of liquid metals (though the trick of letting the system draw a vacuum to suck the filler into the crack might work). I figure it's the combination of heat, pressure and steam that screws up the cure. What did work was Permatex Gas Tank and Radiator Repair. You can get it or something like it at an auto supply store. It's a roll of epoxy with a core of hardner; knead it to disperse the hardner throughout the epoxy and force it into the crack and let it harden. I had to turn off the radiator for a couple of hours to let it set. No leaks and it's been about two months now in a heavy duty heating season.
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I had a radiator that was leaking from the bottom, where two sections met.
I used Loctite Epoxy Putty Sealant (SM-100) that I got from the local hardware store for under $5. This dries to a white color that can be painted to match the radiator.
The secret is to clean every bit of dirt and grime and flakey rust from the area around the leak. Use a damp sponge and a wire brush. This may take a while with an old radiator. It will also help you in locating the leak.
Make sure the area is dry before applying the patching material.
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And if you have any way to reduce the air pressure inside the radiator so the putty will be sucked into the crack, do so.
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Rich Greenberg Work: Rich.Greenberg atsign worldspan.com + 1 770 563 6656
N6LRT Marietta, GA, USA Play: richgr atsign panix.com + 1 770 321 6507
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