stapling roofing felt

Stapling sounds like a fast way to fasten felt to roof planks. Is it more likely to leak than nailing? (A roofing nail has a head, but maybe the felt seals better around the leg of a staple.)
What length staples should be used? Where should they be placed?
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Dont use staples with "paper" thin felt, will just tear out.
On heavier grade ie with granules on, or polyester based felt should be ok. Regards depth of staple suggest you experiment but obvioulsy deeper the better regards holding felt down in adverse weather.
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On Wed, 13 Jul 2005 22:57:33 -0400, Choreboy

They use tin tabs for felt. They are nails with 1" washers so the felt won't rip out.
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On Thu, 14 Jul 2005 01:45:11 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

....while walking on it or from the wind. ;o)
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On Wed, 13 Jul 2005 22:57:33 -0400, Choreboy

Felt is more of a moisture barrier than anything else.
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On Wed, 13 Jul 2005 22:57:33 -0400, Choreboy

Felt needs to be fastened down. Some installers use a hammer tacker with short staples, 1/2" or so.
When we install felt we use what are known as "tin caps." They are called this because they once (and sometimes still are) little more than mis-cut metal bottle caps. We prefer the ones that are 1 5/8" in diameter, although you can buy them up to two inches in diameter. We use Paslode roofing pneumatic staple guns and over good, clean, strong decking 7/8" or 1" roofing staples are sufficient.
Depending on how long the felt will provide the only protection for the roof, and current weather conditions (just a part of a day or over night or longer, and windy and/or rain expected) determines the placement and number of fasteners needed. Put the tin cap where you want it, shoot a staple through it, and move on to the next. If it is overnight or windy or rainy, the fasteners need to be closer together. If the roof is steep the fasteners need to be closer together.
Don't worry about leaks. Once you get shingles installed that is your primary water protection. At that point, the felt merely helps carry off the occasional drop or two that may penetrate the shingles in rare weather conditions (exceptionally windy rainstorm, etc.) What is more important than the fasteners used to install the felt is to make sure the felt is installed correctly.
-- John Willis snipped-for-privacy@airmail.net (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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Choreboy wrote:
Stapling sounds like a fast way to fasten felt to roof planks. Is it more likely to leak than nailing? (A roofing nail has a head, but maybe the felt seals better around the leg of a staple.) What length staples should be used? Where should they be placed?
Just be careful walking on the stapled felt, especially if the roof has much pitch to it. It'll tear, and you'll go sliding off. I recommend inch and a quarter nails through 30# felt for dangerous pitches. Tom
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tom wrote:

My BIL used shingle nails about that long, so I guess he was right and I was wrong. What do you think of the tin tabs mentioned above, with the 1" washers?
What's a dangerous pitch? My roof is 6/12. I find it significantly worse than the porch's 5/12. In the past I've used a rope when working near the eaves. I want to use roof jacks for peace of mind and convenience. My BIL is against it.
To make room for ladders, I've cut back the old azaleas below the eaves. The pruned stubs are thicker than broomsticks. That gives me a strong motive to avoid falling.
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Choreboy wrote:

Overkill if you are covering the felt the same day you lay it. The discussion of useing them is for weathering in a roof with felt that won't be covered for a day or two (or longer). Staples (1/2") in a swing tacker is all that is required in your case.

What is his objection? They are a standard tool for working on roofs. I roofed my house 5/12 without them but that is a fairly mild pitch. I re-roofed two sheds and the garage last year at about 6/12 and used them. I wouldn't consider not using them on that pitch. While you -can- work a 6/12 without them, you will be constantly worried about your traction and balance.
<snip>
Harry K
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maybe he wants Choreboy to fall off?
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Choreboy wrote:

Remember that it will be the shingles that will hold it in place once it is done. If you were careful and had no wind, you could put the felt down with no fashioners add the shingles and it would be fine.
Don't worry so much.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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