Stapling romex to sheet rock?

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Funny... In my area (NY) you cannot use the plastic inside because if it burns it'll give off toxic fumes. Only allowed OUTSIDE or in non power runs (like using it to channel alarm wires etc through a house)
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Wouldn't it burn the same regardless of what kind of wires are in it?
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Obviously low-voltage applications such as signalling wires are not nearly as likely to start a fire as 120VAC.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

There are lots of ways fires start. Toxic fumes are toxic regardless.
Properly designed and installed 120V systems shouldn't start fires, either. That's what circuit breakers are for.
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The point is that even an IMproperly installed low-voltage system won't start a fire.

Sort of. More accurate, perhaps, to say "that's what arc-fault circuit interrupter breakers are for."
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On 15 Jan 2006 20:51:48 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

When was the last time you checked. I heard NYC has abandoned their archaic electrical code and went to the National Electric Code. Now if we could just get the UAW strangle hold off of Chicago.
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On 14 Jan 2006 22:44:02 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I don't know where the OP is, but where I am armored cable (BX) isn't allowed to be exposed.

True. But a bender isn't expensive and the learning curve isn't that steep for basic work. I agree that the OP may want to check out Wiremold.
Greg Guarino
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There are super long special drill bits for this problem, home depot sells them.
They are 3 feet long, and have a hole in the end of the bit, so make opening. drill 3 feet or more with a extension, then make new hole, or install box in this hole:)
You use the hole for holding a wire or string to pull the new cable.
I think they are made by greenlee or soomething like that. also ideal from going from a wall swtch to the attic or basement
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