Standard size of shut-off valve?

So after the fiasco of having to search for a plumbing supply house that carried a PEX compression fitting in the right size for the hot water shut off under the kitchen sink, I should have known better.
But when the hot water shut-off in the downstairs bathroom started leaking, I went to the Big Box stores (plural) and found none of them carry a shut-off valve in the size I need. The largest they have for the incoming supply line is 5/8" diameter, and mine looks to be 3/4".
So, my question: who do I call down vengeance from God upon? My inclination is to blame the Big Box stores for not carrying a proper selection of shut-off valves. Or did the plumber use non-standard sizes when he ran all the water supply lines when the house was built?
Plumbers, weigh in, please!
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......looks to be 3/4"?.......
please clarify
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What type of tubing are we discussing? Galvanized thread, sweat copper, or?????
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
So after the fiasco of having to search for a plumbing supply house that carried a PEX compression fitting in the right size for the hot water shut off under the kitchen sink, I should have known better.
But when the hot water shut-off in the downstairs bathroom started leaking, I went to the Big Box stores (plural) and found none of them carry a shut-off valve in the size I need. The largest they have for the incoming supply line is 5/8" diameter, and mine looks to be 3/4".
So, my question: who do I call down vengeance from God upon? My inclination is to blame the Big Box stores for not carrying a proper selection of shut-off valves. Or did the plumber use non-standard sizes when he ran all the water supply lines when the house was built?
Plumbers, weigh in, please!
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On Sun, 19 Feb 2012 07:45:41 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

I've never seen 3/4" used for any residential faucet feed/shutoff. Always 1/2". Seen some toilets (older houses) use 3/8".
--Vic
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On Feb 19, 7:45am, "Stormin Mormon"

He did say: "PEX compression fitting in the right size for the hot water shut off"
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I've found the answer to my question. It's the plumber who's to blame for the problem I have in trying to fix this leaky valve.
After a fruitless quest at two local plumbing supply stores and after going to the office of the builder who built this house in the mid-90s, I've learned the following: (1) the plumbing in my house isn't PEX, it's polybutelyne. I know, I know, I've heard about the dangers of polybuteyne pinholing from too much chlorine in the water, but the builder assures me that was not Quest polybutelyne, and they've not had a problem in any of the 400+ houses they've built in the area that are run with Quest. (2) the valve is Genova CPVC, and it looks like the downstairs bathroom was run with CPVC as well. Someone wanna tell me whether it was a bad idea or not for someone to connect CPVC to polybutelyne? (3) no one within 80 miles sells Genova or even CPVC at all. No way I'm gonna pay to have the company overnight ship me a replacement valve. (4) the guy at Northeast Plumbing Supply who I thought was giving me a good work-around using a different compression fitting didn't know enough to realize he'd mismatched the threading on the valve and the adaptor he sold me, and the compression fitting is loose. Drip, drip, drip.
Bottom line: tomorrow a plumber I've worked with on a couple Habitat For Humanity projects is coming in to fix this cluster-frell.
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Thanks for the field report. Glad you got it figured out, before the leak got any worse.
Water leaks are like tooth aches. They don't get better on their own, usually.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I've found the answer to my question. It's the plumber who's to blame for the problem I have in trying to fix this leaky valve.
After a fruitless quest at two local plumbing supply stores and after going to the office of the builder who built this house in the mid-90s, I've learned the following: (1) the plumbing in my house isn't PEX, it's polybutelyne. I know, I know, I've heard about the dangers of polybuteyne pinholing from too much chlorine in the water, but the builder assures me that was not Quest polybutelyne, and they've not had a problem in any of the 400+ houses they've built in the area that are run with Quest. (2) the valve is Genova CPVC, and it looks like the downstairs bathroom was run with CPVC as well. Someone wanna tell me whether it was a bad idea or not for someone to connect CPVC to polybutelyne? (3) no one within 80 miles sells Genova or even CPVC at all. No way I'm gonna pay to have the company overnight ship me a replacement valve. (4) the guy at Northeast Plumbing Supply who I thought was giving me a good work-around using a different compression fitting didn't know enough to realize he'd mismatched the threading on the valve and the adaptor he sold me, and the compression fitting is loose. Drip, drip, drip.
Bottom line: tomorrow a plumber I've worked with on a couple Habitat For Humanity projects is coming in to fix this cluster-frell.
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On 2/18/2012 5:51 PM, Kyle wrote:

that carried a PEX compression fitting in the right size for the hot water
shut off under the kitchen sink, I should have known better.

leaking, I went to the Big Box stores (plural) and found none of them
carry a shut-off valve in the size I need. The largest they have for the
incoming supply line is 5/8" diameter, and mine looks to be 3/4".

inclination is to blame the Big Box stores for not carrying a proper
selection of shut-off valves. Or did the plumber use non-standard sizes
when he ran all the water supply lines when the house was built?

Kyle, good chance to investigate. Things are easier if you don't need it to survive.
Figure out how to open up the case - this may require a set of cheap vandal proof hex tips.
Once you're in there, check the continuity of the cord from the plug in spades to the wire on the inside.
If good, then check continuity through the switch - this will normally be the black wire.
If good, then Check the continuity from the black lead to the far side of the thermal fuse.
If good, then disconnect the wires at the heating element. Ohm the two leads. It should be some number below 50. If it is a huge number, it is probably time to throw the whole thing away.
--


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Keep the whole world singing . . .
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On Sunday, February 19, 2012 11:40:37 PM UTC-5, DanG wrote:

Dan, are you suggesting I introduce electricity into my sink's supply lines?!? <heh!>
This was too funny. Sounds like you were answering someone's water heater problem? Hope you got the post to the correct forum and questioner!
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