Standard Incandescent vs. Halogen Lumens Output

I want to use a medium base halogen light bulb where I have previously used both a standard incandescent as well as a CFL. The size restriction of the fixture dictates that the envelope be no larger than a 60 watt incandescent bulb. I believe the recommended maximum wattage is also listed as 60 watts.
I need more light from this fixture. Is there a chart or "rule of thumb" comparing the light output in lumens of regular incandescent and halogen bulbs? I've tried using Google, but haven't found exactly what I'm looking for.
TIA
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Wayne Boatwright
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wrote:

For more light use a 25w cfl, it will equal 100w incandesant.
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On Thu, 04 Jun 2009 05:48:57 GMT, Wayne Boatwright

    Not really.
    In general the longer the life the less efficient. halogen lamps only add a little life to the equation.
    I believe your best bet is going to be the CFL and since the technology has not really matured yet, there is a lot of variations in them and what was on the shelf last year has been changed by now. Good Luck
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On Jun 4, 7:44 am, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Just go to the store and look at the actual bulbs. The packages include both the watts and lumens. You'll find that halogens give a little more output than a std incandescent, but not a huge increase. One significant diff though is that the haogens will tend to maintain that output with less decline over time and last longer.
If you want a big increase, go with the CFL.

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*The best thing that I have found for comparing lumens, lamp life and physical dimensions of light bulbs are the catalogs from major lamp manufacturers such as GE, Sylvania and Philips. Electrical supply companies sometimes have them to give out, but you can look at the web sites.
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On Thu 04 Jun 2009 06:18:27a, John Grabowski told us...

Thanks, John. I'll take a look.
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On Thu, 04 Jun 2009 05:48:57 GMT, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Go to Graingers. They have the details for each bulb:
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/wwg/productIndex.shtml?operator=retrieveProdLevel1Index&prodLevelList=Light%2BBulb%257CLight%2BBulbs%252C&prod_level_selected=Light%2BBulb
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On Thu 04 Jun 2009 06:48:54a, Kuskokwim told us...

Thanks you! Good source!
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Boatwright wrote:

60 watt incandescents vary from 600 to 890 lumens, depending on life expectancy, filament design, and quality. Lumens for "general purpose" lightbulbs are generally stated on the package.
Ones of "Big 3" manufacture (including ones with "store brand" labeling) and rated to last 1000 hours typically produce 840-890 lumens.
60 watt 120V halogens in "A19" and similar bulbs produce 840 to 965 lumens. 965 lumens is output of Sylvania's 60A/HAL/F 120V, probably best-available from electric/lighting supply shops that carry Sylvania products - even then likely by special order in packages of 12.
The highest wattage CFL that does not produce more convected/conducted heat than a 60 watt incandescent is 40 watts - which produces about 2600 lumens (or a little less). CFLs over 23 watts often overheat if operated base-up or where heat accumulates around them. A 23 watt CFL produces typically 1600 lumens, maybe closer to 1450 "in average age and condition".
In small enclosed fixtures and recessed ceiling fixtures, CFLs not rated for use in such fixtures can overheat, especially if of wattage over 14 watts. (Non-spiral ones up to 18 watts in my experience have a fair to high rate of ding OK in recessed ceiling fixtures).
Philips SLS ("triple arch") non-dimmable up to 23 watts was rated for use in recessed ceiling fixtures last time I checked.
(Wondering how a CFL can be more efficient than an incandescent at both producing light and heating a fixture? The answer is that CFLs produce little infrared while incandescents and halogens produce a lot of infrared - which becomes heat where it is absorbed, mostly outside the fixture.)
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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On Thu 04 Jun 2009 02:31:03p, Don Klipstein told us...

A lot of good information, Don. Thanks... I'm currently using the maximum physical size of CFL that will fit in the fixture, but it doesn't produce enough light. IIRC, it's a 13 watt spiral.
The fixture is a suspended ceiling mount bowl-shaped stained glass with the bulb socket suspended from a rod in the center. There isn't a lot of clearance between the socket and bottom of the bowl.
The other issue is that a CFL dulls the color of the glass. A clear bulb of some sort is preferable. The largest incandescent I can fit in it is a 60 watt. I've seen clear decorative halogen lights used in wall-mounted porch lights and the light was clear and brilliant. The envelope would fit, too. That might be worth a shot.
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