Stair tread replacement

Page 2 of 2  

Bernie Hunt wrote:

Show us the damage--my inclination would be as others to repair it instead as first choice. Unless it's really bad, a glue joint may be almost indistinguishable and as strong or stronger than the original wood. (Done lots of antebellum renovations in VA; seen about as bad as can get, salvaged most...)
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I did this on ours, but from the bottom. Plastering can be a rewarding experience. Anyway, ...
I glued and screwed a piece of 3/4" plywood into the bottom of the damaged treads, and then cleated that to the stair frame. (Be sure the screws don't poke through.) I also screwed the risers into the back of the treads.
So far (3 yrs), this has held up.
G
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Something tells me that if I ever have to get under my stairs to repair a damaged tread or 2, and then have to replace the drywall/ plaster, I'm gonna add supports under *every* tread so I never have to go under there again.
All else being equal, if 1 or 2 treads split, I gotta assume others will. Even if they weren't going to before, they will as soon as I close up the opening.
God's like that sometimes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bernie Hunt" wrote

Thanks for the pics Bernie, helped alot. Worked on a house once with a stairwell that looked much like that. The 'top stringer' that showed was cosmetic. The real only support member was underneath. We removed it as it was ugly and warped. Then we put corner molding along both sides. (the risers were flush to the steps so this wasnt that hard).
Assuming however the 'stringer' isnt cosmetic (since you have a better view in person, you'd know), then I'd take out the bad wood and cut a replacement that will drop down and fit, but won't have the one side fit into the stringer (fill that portion in with something).
Support by strong brackets to the bottom stringer (apply brackets, then drop stair on them after fitting in at the other end). If the risers are properly supported, put more brackets on the bottom of the stair. With careful measuring, you can get a tight 'fit' so the stair doesnt wiggle (in any direction) and with predrilled holes, you can attach to the lower riser then cover with some sort of wood putty.
Cosmetics, I'd carefully paint the risers and restain the steps. The risers do not appear to be the same level of pretty wood that the steps are.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
cshenk,
That's the direction I'm headed. Get the old stair out and then brace all the way around underneath. The left side of the stairwell, when assending, is a wall all the way to the ceiling. The right side stops at floor level on the second floor. So people will be looking to the right as the accend the steps. I'll flll the left side dado so it's flush with the surface on the stringer. Then I'll cut the new step to fit in the right side dado and lie on the new cleat on the left side.
The one I showed you will be the easier one, the upper stair has the knwel post sitting on it. I'll have to look at removing it.
Bernie

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bernie Hunt" wrote

Can you get us a pic of that too then? Hey, the camera might not be perfect but it works well enough and it's what you have. Perhaps we'll have some workable ideas for you but have to see the post and railing.
I liked the idea of the riser access too but only if you are real sure there isnt a support member behind it. Then again, I figured you had to remove a stair tred anyways, so the riser access might be more work?
Tap carefully with a hammer (rubber mallet works better) all along the tops of several stairs (healthy ones as well as bad ones) from left to right. If there's a fairly consistant sound difference at some spot, usually middle, then you have a 3rd structural stringer that you couldnt see because of the plaster underside. There's good reason for it too as it's underside makes the lath frame the plaster may have been attached to. It may *not* be in the center. Say they had a bunch of that lath frame wood in scrappy form that was 2 ft long (left over from some other part of building the house). Stairwell looks like it's abut 3. Might be you find a 3rd support stringer 2ft from one side and about a foot on the other. Harmless and easy to tap along several steps to see if you can tell something is there before you open anything up.
I wish I had a picture to show you of what the underside might be since it's plastered. Generally the frame that was plastered has a support frame with I think it's no more than 18 inches. Similar to studs in a wall then cross pieces you plastered. Methods varied with age of house. wikipedeia look for lath and plaster.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bernie Hunt" wrote

Hi Bernie, I imagine it's done now? Curious how it went.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bernie Hunt wrote:

I'd go with the drill, glue, and screw as others mentioned. If you want to clamp it before installing the screw (I would), wedge a 2x4 between the edge of the tread and the wall opposite (cut to length). If the opposite wall is sheet rock or plaster, first use a 2x4 across 2 studs so it doesn't poke a hole in the wall.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.