stainless steel restoration

Hello,
I've got a countertop here that's got some problems. It appears to be stainless steel, but there seems to be a bit of corrosion in a few places. I think the word 'pitting' best describes what I'm seeing. This counter isn't vintage or anything, just a typical kitchen counter. As it's in an otherwise lousy apartment building, it was probably the cheapest thing that could be found at the time of purchase.
So, although I'm pretty sure I can't undo the pitting, what I'd like to do is make the color of these depressions, which are a slightly darker grey, the same as the surrounding metal.
Any suggestions about a common and preferably mild chemical (this would be best since I'm overseas) or product I could get that might achieve this?
Thanks!
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I'd think polishing with a mild abrasive like a powder cleanser would clean it up. With some water and a soft pad.
Probably a weak acid would do it too.
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HCl is what I use to clean Stainles 302. You could try "Lime-Away" or similar "off-shelf" product. I think that's Oxacilic Acid or such.

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Thanks for the suggestions!
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Let us know...

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On 25 Jan 2005 03:36:09 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

What may help is auto rubbing compound. There are several abrasive grades available, so depending on the kind of shine (and work) you are willing to do, get 2 or 3 grades. Use an electric auto buffer. I do this once a year to shine my stainless steel sinks, and use Brasso other times to make the steel and faucet fixtures shine like new.
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Thanks a lot everyone. This is exactly the sort of info I was looking for.
No electric buffer though, this'll require elbow grease, heh. Thanks again.
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The suggestions already made for the mild abrasives (cleansers) would work best for the pitting or discoloration. When I worked in a restaurant that had stainless steel counters in the kitchen preparation area, the cooks used club soda to clean the counters when they wanted them to shine.
Mark

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