Stabbing outlets in the back

Apropos recent threads here about "back-stabbed" outlets, a data point:
New client, big multi-million-dollar house high up in the Berkeley/Oakland hills, less than 15 years old, very well built, client has good relationship with builder.
All outlets are wired through back-wire connections (*not* screw connections). Client reports no electrical problems.
Maybe this isn't so bad as some people make it sound. It certainly seems to be the preference of a lot of electricians who want to get the place wired up fast.
For myself, I will continue to use the screw terminals, as I don't have to meet any kind of schedule in my work.
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When you use a back stab connection, it's very easy to push the wire in and miss the spring clamp inside. Someone that does this hundreds of times is more likely to be able to feel when the wire isn't inserted properly, and correct it. Inexperienced people should always use the slower, more reliable method of screw terminals. When I wired new houses, I routinely used back stabs, and never had a problem. I have however, been on numerous open circuit service calls, that were caused by back stabs.
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*The problems with the back-stabbed outlets usually show up on circuits with a good load on them. On circuits where there is little load a problem may never occur. The same thing can happen with screw terminals though it usually takes much longer to manifest itself.
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True that, limiting back stabs to 15 amp circuits was a smart NEC move

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David Nebenzahl wrote:

Are you sure that are the back-wire outlets with the spring clips, and not the vastly superior back-clamp outlets which are usually "spec grade"? The back-wire outlets will have the little release slot next to the wire hole, while the back-clamp outlets will not. At quick glance they look the same.
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Pete C. wrote:

I always called the 'back-clamp' type 'back wire' outlets. The Leviton web site says 'back wire' in their product descriptions meaning the screw clamp type and 'quick wire push in' when showing the 'back stab' type.
One thing to remember when using the 'back clamp' type devices: You must turn the screws all the way out if not already, then push and hold the side screws all the way in with your fingers BEFORE inserting the wires. Then tighten the side screws. If not done properly the wire will end up behind the clamp and the wire will not be secure. This goes for GFCI outlets as well which mostly all have the 'clamp' type terminals.
Kevin
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On 3/15/2009 3:32 PM Pete C. spake thus:

Yes, I know the difference. These are the garden variety side-screw ones with the little holes on the back, not back-clamp outlets.
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I live a few hundred yards from the ocean in Hawaii. My back-stabbed connections worked fine for 25 years. But then a bit of corrosion got the best of them and I've been rewiring as needed to use the screws. Time will tell in Berkely/Oakland.
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On Mon, 16 Mar 2009 12:02:37 GMT, Wayne Boatwright

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