Squeaks in subfloor

My 20 year old house is getting new rugs. Before the installers come in, I'm cutting out sections of old carpet where squeaks have developed. I have taken two approaches. first, ball-peening the old nails back in snugly and then screwing down adjacent to the old screws with new flooring screws. My question, is this going to an extreme? Can I eliminate the screws and just make sure to sink the existing nails into the subfloor? I do want to make sure that we don't have any squeaks develop in the next few years. Thanks for your help.
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I don't think you are out of order. Last time I dealt with this was a summer vacation house where I had problems with the kitchen floor. I used rosin coated ring nails before I replaced the tiles, having pulled up the old ones, put down 3/16" Luan sheet, leveled cracks, etc. I used leveler over the heads of the nails, as I wanted a smooth surface, and no "print through."
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IME, a loose nail can be counted on the second time maybe 5 times in 100. I'd pull it and replace with something larger and more reliable, then nail adjacent if it appeared like a good idea.
I guess they screw down sub-floors these days but when I was a kid we would not because 1) we never thunk of it, and 2) based on the principle that nails will bend and still hold, while screws break and let loose.
Probably not that critical, either way, but you certainly don't seem to me to be going overboard. -----
- gpsman
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Nail popped once, it will pop again. Use the screws and do the job right so it only has to be done one time. Add some screws in other places for insurance too. .
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If you can, and if it's still squeaking, try inserting some screws up from the bottom.
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Solved a very noisy floor that straddled a beam. Used over 1000 screws to seal it down. Then I levelled it with filler as it was low on both sides of the beam. Then I glued and used 1" long staples to fasten 1/4" fir plywood down to change the thickness from 5/8" to 7/8" total. It made the floor, silent, solid and flat.

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Some good ideas in these posts. If you plan on using a lot of screws, get plated ones suitable for decking. Corrosion can wipe out drywall types in a floor in just a few years given the moisture conditions there common to many houses. Further, rent or buy an impact screwdriver. It will speed the work at least triple or more, and allow to set the screw exactly level or slightly countersunk. Another option (my favorite) is a framing air gun and ring shank plated nails like Senco GL24 or GL27, by far the fastest way to do it. HTH
Joe
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