Squeak in floor

New construction house. Major squeak in carpeted subfloor. Minor squeaks elsewhere. Builder does not want to fix because "at this point I'd have to take up the carpet." My reply was more or less "tough shit bub". He put it on the list to do, but he has not done it and I don't think he will. Suggestions for fixing on my own? Can you drive a headless nail down in there so far it won't ever be an issue with walking on carpet or padding? But then, how do you know where the joist is?
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The "correct" way of fixing is to pull up the carpet, find the offending location, clearance drill the plywood & drive a couple flat screws (NOT a drywall screw!) into the joist. Fixed in that location forever. Re-stretch & secure the carpet
That said, a lot of work to quiet a squeak.
The quick & dirty way to fix it..........a finish nailer (16 gage, preferably 15 gage), crank up the pressure and shoot some nail down through the carpet into the joist. Shoot the nails at an angle perpendicular to the joist to attempt to get some clamping behavior.
cheers Bob
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jeffc wrote:

I have dealt with this issue in two ways (I did not build the floors, I was just fixing squeaks). If the framing is accessable, then force PL400 into the joint between the subfloor and the joists. On both sides if possible and as much as is needed. Don't walk on the floor until the adhesive sets.
In the event that the framing is not accessable, I use trim screws to go through the carpet, through the subfloor and into the joist. It is a bit tricky to find the joists, but not that hard.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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If the builder's list is in writing and the list is in your contract with the builder, you, of course, can go with the remedy written in the contract. And taking up the carpet is easy, especially if there is no furniture on it yet and you have the right tools, as a builder would have. Doing it yourself is as easy as buying a floor squeak kit sold at Lowe's etc. I've used one and it really works.
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How about deck screws? I believe the reason you don't want to use dry wall screws is because they are brittle and can break with stress. Also I'm wondering if you need to pull up the carpet? Why can't you just make a small hole with an awl, start the screw through the hole and then when you get the head of the screw down near the small hole in the carpet, slowly work it through. There will only be a very small opening (not a cut) left in the fabric of the carpeting and with a little brushing it should disappear completely. I don't suppose it would work as well with short napped or indoor outdoor carpet but you could try it some where where it wouldn't show and see.

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Deck screws will work fine. Poking through the carpet is ok as well.
A purist (not me unless the stuff was really expensive) would take up the carpet but how time do you want to spend on this fix?
Ideally, you want a clearance hole through the plywood so the screw can pull it down against the joist.
Be careful when drilling or driving, watch out for any carpet material getting wrapped around the drill or driver, which will cause a run in the carpet.
I've seen contractors shoot through the carpet with a framinng gun & 8d ring shanks and call it good.
cheers Bob
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