Square footage

I have seen allot of people mention how many square feet their house is. I know how to measure sq. ft. But what parts of a house do you measure & which do you not? I would imagine the bedrooms, living rm, kitchen, & dens. But what about hallways, baths and basements? TIA
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air conditioned or heated floor space

which
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excluding basment, even if used as living space. ~Kat
"help is on the way" ~John Kerry
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Jarkat2002 wrote:

Why? It's a two-story house with one level below ground.
According to Dilbert's dream house, it's not only cheaper to put the second floor below ground, it's WAY cheaper to heat and cool the result.
http://dilbert.com/comics/dilbert/duh/
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Thanks all!!
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Not here! And not in the places where I've looked for houses. Finished basements are counted just like the 1st and 2nd floors. Then there are split levels (trilevels) where you count the lowest level which is essentially the same as many basements. And what do you count on a daylight basement which is less basement like than the lowest level of a trilevel? You count it as part of the total square footage.
Jarkat2002 wrote:

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For what it's worth, insurance companies in Califoria seem to go by the exterior, not interior, dimensions (at least for a single level house).
Eric wrote:

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Yep!
During the brief time I had a real estate sales license, we were taught the same thing. Exterior measured area times number of floors but don't count "unfinished space."
If you are comparing properties for your own use, count basements (finished or not) separately.

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Eric wrote:

If I remember correctly, during my brief career in Real Estate, you measure the outside dimensions and multiply by the number of floors above grade. It's gets a bit tricky with backsplits etc., but the same principle applies. Commercial space is the same btw.
Peter H
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The tax assessor and insurers use the outside wall dimensions but that is not really a fair number if you are looking at living space. That number may be used by real estate folks but mostly because that is a published number that is available as a public record. If I get a few minutes I will look at a set of plans and see how builders come up with their numbers.
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Peter H wrote:

And if the dwelling is completely below ground?
And if commercial space is below ground level?
Bah!
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Greetings,
Eric wrote:

This is totally dependent on where you are. When we built our house the local planning department used *all covered space* (i think higher than 5' or somesuch) when coming up with our limits -- including garage and basement.
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