Square D electrical panel question

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I noticed a friends's Square D panel, the neutral and ground (from the utility company feed) are connected to the same bar. And less than an inch apart.
Shouldn't the ground be connected to the separate ground bar?
Should I move the ground wire?
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On Thu, 3 Mar 2016 21:40:14 -0500, Stormin Mormon

I had a girlfriend who told me that the earth moved. So I guess she'd say yes.
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On Thu, 3 Mar 2016 21:40:14 -0500, Stormin Mormon

No if this is the service disconnect enclosure where the ground electrode conductor lands and the main disconnect resides they will be on the same bus bar.
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On 3/3/2016 11:47 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The question is about the circuit breaker panel in the cellar. There is a main breaker, but I'd not call it a main disconnect.
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On Friday, March 4, 2016 at 7:00:14 AM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Unless there is another disconnect before it, then the main breaker is the main and only disconnect. Most panels here, the main breaker serves as the disconnect.
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On Friday, March 4, 2016 at 7:00:14 AM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

What would you call the main disconnect?
Is there another disconnect between the pole/underground wires and the panel? If not, the main breaker in the panel is also the main disconnect.
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On 3/4/2016 9:39 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Mains = wire coming in from the power company. Main disconnect = a disconnect outside the house. (yes, I've seen these before.) Main breaker = the breaker that shuts off power to all the smaller breakers.
I do not call a breaker in a panel a "main disconnect".
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On Friday, March 4, 2016 at 9:52:48 AM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Just because you don't call it a "main disconnect" doesn't make you right.
Main disconnect <> a disconnect outside the house.
"2008 NEC Article 230.70 (A) (1) The service disconnecting means shall be installed at a readily accessible location either outside of a building or structure or inside nearest the point of entrance of the service conductors."
The "breaker panel" inside the house could be a "service panel" or a "distribution panel". If the main breaker is enclosed in that panel and serves as the main disconnect, then the panel is a "service panel". If the "main disconnect" is in an enclosure by itself which then feeds another enclosure full of breakers for the individual circuits, then the "first" enclosure is the service panel and the "second" is the distribution panel.
Review the conversation in this thread, or any other site of your choice:
(Sorry for the long link, I can not access tinyurl at this time)
http://www.inspectionnews.net/home_inspection/electrical-systems-home-inspection-and-commercial-inspection/13903-main-disconnect-s-vs-main-service-panel.html
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On Friday, March 4, 2016 at 10:14:43 AM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Just testing GG. Bye!
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On Fri, 4 Mar 2016 09:52:45 -0500, Stormin Mormon

I wouldn't either, I would call it the service disconnect if it was the first disconnecting means after the service point. (the place where the utility's wires connect to yours)
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On Friday, March 4, 2016 at 12:29:35 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Not pushing back, just curious...
Do you not call it a "main disconnect" based on some official terminology or just based on your preference? The reason I ask is this:
If I DAGS for images of Main Disconnect or images of Service Disconnect, I get a combination of images that use either of those terms, and even a Main Service Disconnect thrown in every now and then.
Some images come from Home Inspection sites, some come from .gov sites, etc. There doesn't seem to be a "standard".
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On Fri, 4 Mar 2016 11:04:44 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

The NEC refers to it as the "service disconnecting means" and that commonly gets rounded off to service disconnect, main disconnect or other things. As long as we understand what we are talking about it is just semantics.
The main bonding jumper (the place where the neutral gets grounded) must be in the same enclosure where the service disconnect resides. Some AHJs have ruled that it can be anywhere in "service equipment" and allow it in the meter can if the ground electrode conductor lands there too. This is because most meter cans ground the neutral.
I am not sure how they justify it because 250.24(B) seems pretty unambiguous
(B) Main Bonding Jumper. For a grounded system, an unspliced main bonding jumper shall be used to connect the equipment grounding conductor(s) and the service-disconnect enclosure to the grounded conductor within the enclosure for each service disconnect in accordance with 250.28.
The important thing is that the neutral does not get regrounded after the place where the grounding electrode lands. There used to be an exception for sub panels in another building with a grounding electrode system but that went away during the Clinton administration.
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On Friday, March 4, 2016 at 2:32:45 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Thanks once again for sharing your expertise.
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On Fri, 4 Mar 2016 12:03:00 -0800 (PST), Uncle Monster

You only use that screw in the service disconnect enclosure. In a sub panel you install the supplemental grounding bus and bring the equipment grounding conductor to that (4 wire feeder) The neutral bus remains isolated.
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On Fri, 4 Mar 2016 16:56:37 -0800 (PST), Uncle Monster

The can/housing of ALL panels needs to be grounded, as does every switch and outlet box, as well as all utility boxes. ONLY in the "main/service disconnect" may the neutral and ground be directly connected. The neutral bonding screw or jumper connects the neutral buss to the case ground.
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On Fri, 4 Mar 2016 19:14:46 -0800 (PST), Uncle Monster

My square D has split neutral and about 6 ground blocks - makes it a real treat to wire.
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On 3/4/2016 9:39 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Anyone wish to answer the OP's OQ?
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On Saturday, March 5, 2016 at 7:46:12 AM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

to grounded? I may have the wrong vision in my head but I think I imagined that the ground bar was in an insulated holder like the neutral bar but now I remember the grounding bar being attached directly to the can/housing. D rain bamage, not enough sleep. Sometimes I can't spell kat. o_O

It was answered within hours of your question, with a qualifying "if". Since you never directly addressed the "if" it's on you.
I'll make it easy for you:
If this "if" is true, then you already have your answer:
"No if this is the service disconnect enclosure where the ground electrode conductor lands and the main disconnect resides..."
If that "if" is not true, then you need to tell us more about the installation. In other words, if the service disconnect is not in the panel you are asking about, then where is it?
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On Saturday, March 5, 2016 at 8:16:27 AM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

e to grounded? I may have the wrong vision in my head but I think I imagine d that the ground bar was in an insulated holder like the neutral bar but n ow I remember the grounding bar being attached directly to the can/housing. Drain bamage, not enough sleep. Sometimes I can't spell kat. o_O

+1
IDK what he doesn't understand at this point with no additional input.
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On 3/5/2016 8:33 AM, trader_4 wrote:

I kind of got that impression.
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