Sprinkler zones

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Our water comes from our well. When we built, we had sprinklers installed...keeps the weeds healthy :)
There are two sprinkler zones. Each has sufficient outlets so that the well pump runs constantly instead on-off-on-off etcetera. It is my understanding that this is good as it reduces wear and tear on the pump.
I would now like to add a third zone but there would not be enough outlets to keep the pump from kicking on and off while that zone is active. How is that situation normally handled.
--

dadiOH
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On 2/6/2011 10:03 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Probably trial and error. Try running all 3 zones at the same time and see how it works. If it doesn't work well alternate 2 different zones at a time.
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You not only have a choice in the number of heads, but also in the flow rate of the head. In many cases, eg rotors, you can change the nozzle to change the flow rate. Sooooo, by chosing heads/nozzles with a higher flow rate you can keep the pump running with less heads and then water for a shorter time. If that is impractical, then running two zones at the same time, per the previous advice is another option.
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On Feb 6, 10:47 am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I see you have mastered the 4th dimension - time. Well done, Master Luke. ;)
R
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Add it to one of the other zones. Or get a bigger tank.
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dadiOH wrote:

Thanks for the replies, folks. Unfortunately, adding to an existing zone or running together *with* an existing zone aren't viable options for me because in both cases it would decrease the throw of the existing zone which I don't want to do.
Any other ideas?
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dadiOH
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Use the pump trigger on your timer to force the pump to stay on.
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Trader nailed it. By playing with the number of heads on a line and changing nozzles to adjust the flow rate you can balance almost anything. If you take heads off an existing zone, and add them to the new zone so it has enough heads, then bump up the nozzles to higher flow rates on the existing zone.
I don't have the link handy, but if you DAGS sprinkler irrigation tutorial, you should get a really excellent sprinkler site (not the best looking, but the best information) with step by step procedures to help you tackle it. It boils down to calculations, so you'll have to know pressure (while running and not), flow rate, distances, number of heads, and nozzle flow rates. That's the starting point, then you tweak with the nozzles from there.
R
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Here's the tutorial on designing a system with a well: http://www.irrigationtutorials.com/sprinkler04.htm
R
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On 2/8/2011 9:20 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Add more sprinkler heads in your 3rd zone until it draws enough to keep the pump running then run the first 2 at one time and the 3rd at another time. Of course the 3rd wouldn't have to run as long with all the extra sprinklers.
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People seem to be thinking that the existing two zones are run at the same time. I'm not aware of any typical residential controllers that allow that. I assumed he was running one zone, then the next.
In either event, he has to balance the zones' time vs flow, by adjusting the number of heads and nozzle flow rates, to make the system work.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

Exactly
Considering the fact that the first two zones are pretty much maxed out and that I need a relatively small number of heads on the proposed third zone, I may just cinvince my wife to use a hose :)
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dadiOH
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On 2/8/2011 12:18 PM, dadiOH wrote:

Will using the hose keep the pump running or cycling?
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Tony Miklos wrote:

Cyclying. But so does the shower. The difference is that the shower doesn't run for 45 minutes. Usually.
A hose would put out a lot more water over a given period of time than would a few micro heads. OTOH the heads I need would only use maybe 60 GPH, maybe the pump wouldn't cycle all that much.
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On 2/8/2011 1:20 PM, dadiOH wrote:

So is that a "never mind"?
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Both Rico and I have pointed out that by sizing the heads in the new zone to the right flow rate, you can keep the pump running. What's the problem with that? If you want an accurate answer, providing some additional information would be a good idea, ie what kind of heads, how many, what size area, what the flow rate needs to be to keep the pump on, etc.
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On Feb 9, 8:22 am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

He already stated that he needs a fairly small number of heads on the new zone. There are limits to the head sizing range depending on the type of head. So your solution works in some situations but not all. It sounds like his case is one where it doesn't work.
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That's not clear at all. What's clear is that a correct solution might involve more time and money than it's worth, considering the benefit. And he already has a backup plan Plan Hosen Wifen. ;)
R
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Read the posts.
'I need a relatively small number of heads on the proposed third zone'
You can only adjust the total zone gph within a range based on nozzles available and number of heads.
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I did read all of the OP's posts. You must have missed mine. "If you take heads off an existing zone, and add them to the new zone so it has enough heads, then bump up the nozzles to higher flow rates on the existing zone."
It's doubtful that the existing lines have all nozzles maxed out, and even if they are, he could swap out heads for higher flow heads. And that could open up other problems - like overspray where he doesn't want it, having to relocate heads, etc. It might not be worth the time and effort to him, but if it's important to him, it can be done.
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