Spraypainting without a mask

Sorry if this is the wrong group. I just sprayed something in my garage without any kind of protection. I know it was dumb but I was just wondering if I might have permanently damaged myself as a result? The paint was black rustoleum and I see black residue around my nostrils as well as what came out when I blew my nose. Could there be any long-term damage or will I be fine (I'll definately get myself a respirator for next time)? Any recommendations?
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To late all is lost get the 12 gauge and finish it. Ah just kidding you will live to 102
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My father used to paint one to two cars a day, seven days a week when he owned his own autobodyshop in the 1950's. While he did wear a mask, it was mostly useless. In the evening he would be blowing paint out his nose or rinsing his nose out for several minutes before bed. He lived until 67 when he died of a heart attack. Possibly the paint and its solvents were contributory.
Your health will depend on its present condition, and any allergies or sensitivities that you have. You may notice no lasting problems, or you may never be the same, all depending on your body. Don't do it again!

wondering
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You should be fine, just don't make a habit of inhaling/ingesting any more chemicals than you need to. Different people have different tolerances for these things, and since you don't know where you fall on that scale, play it safe. You might do this daily and live to 102, or you might be one of those people who are sensitive to it and find yourself with a problem after relatively little exposure. Good luck and be careful.
- Magnusfarce

wondering
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I appreciate all the info--I'll make sure to have a respirator next time. I'm not sure which ones are appropriate but I'll look into it. Thanks again.

wondering
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Well, there isn't much you can do about it now. Go out for a walk in the night air (unless you are in city smog) and buy a respirator. BTW, the respirator will get particles, but not vapors. So, if you're working in a cloud of solvent vapor (like spray paint drying) it's a good idea to ventilate. Open doors, and set up fans.
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Stormin Mormonn" wrote:

One-time exposure shouldn't be critical. Second the respirator.

Depends on the respirator. If you buy one with replaceable multi-stage filters you can buy the cartridges that are rated for non-industrial vapor usage, not just particulate matter. As far as particulate matter goes a wet bandana over the nose and mouth works just fine for limited exposure (as long as you tuck it in under your chin).

Even if you're using a respirator rated for vapors this is good advice.
Best,
Marc
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So did it only occur to you after you blew the shit out of your nose that it might not be good for you?
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Larry Bud) wrote in message

I worked in a shop when I was young and I spray painted silver paint. There was a fog of paint in the shop which drove everyone else out while I continued to paint. I suppose it was a good thing the welder quit working also or we would have had an inferno. To date I seem to have recovered fully and have run many marathons. The only long term legacy I worry about is cancer. But for a single exposure I doubt there will be any sequalae.
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One-time exposure to Rustoleum will irritate you but not much else if you don't have any medical condition making you especially sensitive. Repeated long-term exposure would be a different matter.
There are some paints based on isocyanates (Imron is one well-known brand often used for automotive paiting) which are extremely hazardous, and will likely send you to the hospital the first time you spray them without a really good respirator. You do not find these on the shelves at Ace Hardware or Home Depot!
Tim.
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On 2 Dec 2003 17:26:57 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@trailing-edge.com (Tim Shoppa) wrote:

It's not just paints you have to watch out for. Alot of caulks and sealants have as their ingredient Toluene Di-isocyanates. Yes, some of the paints and caulks at at Ace and HD have this as an ingrediant usually althought only about 5% product content. Still, I never apply these products without using a full face respirator with orgainic vapor/P100 catridges. When their is very little ventilation, I use a supplied air respiator. Call me paranoid, but their is no price for good health.
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snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.com (Rob) wrote in message

Can you remind me of brands/products that contain isocyanates? The packaging for Imron etc. makes it perfectly clear that using them without a respirator is extremely dangerous, yet I've never seen any such warnings on caulk. Am I correct that it's the "high-end" sealants that have this nasty stuff?
Tim.
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On 4 Dec 2003 07:47:14 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@trailing-edge.com (Tim Shoppa) wrote:

Yes your are correct for the most part. It is usually in the higher end polyurethane based sealants. Just read the label on anything that says that it is polyurethane based ( foam, caulk, two-part epoxies,marine adhesives.etc.). Just about every manuafacture has a product line that contains this stuff.
It amazes me how often I see contractors using this stuff with no protection in below grade constructionor and in boat hulls with no ventilation. The fumes are heavier than air so you can imagine what happens.
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Isocyanates are precursors of most urethanes. Things like Gorilla glue. For susceptible individuals this can cause that person to become asthmatic. Inhaling the vapors is "not a good thing" if you're susceptible.
Boden
Tim Shoppa wrote:

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Just curious what type of paint were you using? Was it rustoleum primer/paint for metal or garage/concrete/epoxy floor paint?
Why didn't you paint it outside or at least open the garage door open?
Chances are it only contained Toluene or Xylene as it's most hazardous incredients It will give you a nice buzz for a few hours, but that's about if. The liver is a pretty hearty organ and can take alot of abuse before you show serious signs of overexposure. The huffers behind our local Pep Boys have been there for years sniffing carbuerator cleaner everyday and their still standing albeit walking vegetables. OTOH, if the product you used contained methylene chloride as its main ingredient.....well....you have my sympathies.
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It is premium rustoleum satin -- it has the 'stops rust' label on it.
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Don't worry about. If you feel fine now then obviously you have nothing to worry about. Worst case scenario, if your exposure resulted in ingesting a quantity of trimethylbenzene in the paint, you'd probably have a bad case of pneumonia or bronchitis. Your liver would metabolize and and excrete the toxins in about 24-36 hour time frame with no lasting effects. Like everthing else, it all depends on the amount ingested via inhalation and/or absorption thru the skin.
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it's the stuff pictured here: http://rustoleum.com/Product.asp?ddfF&frm_product_id &SBL=1
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