Spraying water on an A/C condensor?

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Anyone ever hear of spraying water from a garden hose on an A/C condensor unit to make it cool more efficiently? A maintenance guy where I work said that it would help. Is he pulling my leg ?
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Yes, it'll help. But you'd get tired standing there, your water bill will go up, and if you do it fulltime, harmful mineral deposits from the tap water will render the cooling fins less effective.
lee
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Lots of times.
It can under the right conditions increase the effective capacity and efficiency of the A/C. It also can reduce both as mineral deposits build up. In addition there is the cost of the water and equipment.
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Joseph Meehan

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Back in the dark ages of the 1960s and earlier, some outside units actually had a misting system built in, when water was cheap and plentiful. Given that today's units are designed to cool without water, I'd leave it alone. If the compressor blew up, and you tried to get it repaired under warranty, I'm sure the company would claim you destroyed it with water. (But you could spray the coils a couple of times during the cooling season to clean any dirt off and make the heat transfer more efficient.)
Lena
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Lena wrote:

I have thought about putting a small pump and catching the condensate and misting with that. Key would be misting, any large quantitiy of water will bog the fan, and may not do you any good.
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I have a small hose and a pail to catch all the water that comes out of my AC. I store this water until the pail is about half filled, then I bottle it and put it in the fridge for drinking water. This is pure distilled water, and saves me a bundle at the grocery store, instead of buying bottled water. This actually saves me about $50 a month that I'd normally spend on distilled drinking water.
Sam
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I imagine it is very pure with all the air that blows across the evaporator coil, the crud in the pan and the mold spores. I imagine it gives you a good dose of protein with the water.
buona salute !
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wrote:

I thought of doing that for plants, but was told the condensate has metals dissolved in it that will harm plants. If it harms plants, I sure wouldn't want to drink it.
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My good friend likes that and drinks it, but most people don't like the lack of minerals that give spring water, and reservoir water, its good taste. You don't miss that?

I tend not to believe this. "Metals"? The only metals it comes in contact with is the aluminum in the evaporator fins and the steel in the pan that forms the bottom of the AC. It spends little time on the fins before it drops off** and little time in the steel pan as it runs to the far end. 5 or 10 seconds? People drink out of aluminum cups all the time, and they cook in steel pots, with hot water. The evaporator fins are cold and the metal pan is not hot either with all that water running through it, so that also lessens any dissolving.
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mm wrote:

I sure as h*ll wouldn't want to drink anything that had been in the drip pan under my AC coils. That sucker is groaty.
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I don't really want to drink distilled water, but the original suggestion was just for watering plants.
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I mean the original suggestion by toller, here, was for watering plants. The other original suggestion (that preceded this :) ) was to drink it. :(? :-)

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Toller wrote:

Plus the condensate from the coils traps all sorts of flying debris, dust, and pollen just ot name the two biggies.
Metals risk is low. The fins are aluminum and aluminum is ok, so long as you do not put acidic foods in the pot (tomatoes most notably).
Heat of evaporation is SO much higher than heat of radiation and heat of convection. Evaporating water off an AC removes LOTS more heat than just blowing air across them. The problem is dissolved minerals in the water. Over time, the waves of successive evaporation will cause insulating minerals to plate out on the coild. Even if you use RO water, you get the mineral plating. Only ultra pure distilled water such as chemical labs use would work and it is NOT cheap water. To be effective at misting this water, you need about 2 gallons per hour of compressor operation.
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wrote:

Please boil it before drinking to kill the nasties. Also, if this is 'drip' from a central a/c, it's likely the overflow line. If so, that means the central a/c normal drain down house plumbing is clogged. Very normal occurrence, but should be cleared or you're risking the evap pan overflow and water damage to ceiling, walls, etc. If a window unit, no problem except health. <g>.
lee h
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While it is water that is condensed out of the air, the cooling coils can have all kinds of strange bacteria on them. I'd not want to drink that.
Distilled water is boiled -- thus killing the parasites.
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Christopher A. Young
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I have a small hose and a pail to catch all the water that comes out

Sam, that's about as far from the truth as you could get. There is more mold, bacteria, dirt, chemicals, and fungus in that water than you realize. Do yourself a favor and quit drinking it, before you hurt yourself, or someone you care about.
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The other key is "condensate" Regular water can cause a buildup of minerals on the fins and make it less efficient.
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Lena wrote:

Here in AZ it used to be fairly common to see the A/C distributors sell bolt-on "pre-coolers", which were basically small evaporative coolers that pre-cooled the air that flowed over the condensor fins. Don't see them advertised much anymore.
Jerry
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Check this out. http://www.acmister.com /
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I think some AC units are supposed to splash some of the condensed water onto the condensor.
D
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