splitting axe/maul

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-snip-

IMO- That's just plain silly. First choice is get wood that splits-- but if that isn't possible, I'd probably break down and get a motorized splitter.
I'm 60 yrs old and haven't swung an axe for more than a dozen swings in 10 years. But I'll bet I can split a cord of decent wood with a splitting axe faster than somebody can operate that $170. contraption.

And unless you have no use of your arms at all, that one seems even sillier.
Anybody that has used either of those devices- or similar- feel free to correct me. [and if you've got the tool and a wood pile within 100 miles of Schenectady, I'd love to come out and split some wood for you just to see them work]
Jim
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I'm 77 and I think I could split wood faster with a hammer and chisel than that asinine rig. I saw a promotional video of one back when the first one showed up on the scene. I counted 7 strokes to split a stove size piece in half. Clear grain and it could have been split with a small hatchet with one swing.
There is a place for it for someone who is so disabled that it is the only tool they could operate.
Harry K
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wrote:
-snip-

I like Oren's idea better-- [buy one already built] but I don't think you'd gain anything but a new toy to play with. See my answer to him.
Jim
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VERY doable, just S-L-O-W!
Steve
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Available on line, I think Harbor Frieght has them, unless one is physically handicapped they are useless. Takes forever to split one piece.
Harry K
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You can rent splitters - or better mooch splitter time from a friend. A case of beer goes a long way toward reducing aching muscles.
RonB
In man talk, a good friend owns a log splitter and knows how to brew beer. And a reeeeeeeealy good friend has a boat, too.
Steve
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Birch splits fine if it doesnt have any knots rest of it the axe will only scar it

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wrote:

If it is the file bouning off the steel of the maul try a belt sander.
If it is the maul bouncing off the rounds of wood then start with ones that have obvious cracks or the smallest ones first until you get the hang of it.
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I see it has been mentioned about green wood. Some is very difficult to split when wet so wait for at least a couple of weeks. You don't want the blade too sharp either as it ill dig in as opposed to pushing the sides apart.
Next is leverage. You want the blade to hit the wood at 90 degrees to the handle, not near the bottom of the swing arc. Get a round of wood to use as the base, then put the wood to be split on top of that,. You get a more powerful and meaningful blow to the grain of the wood,.
Even better is to wait until the cold weather comes. After a long freeze, the wood that is bouncing today will literally pop into two pieces with one well placed hit.
Wear gloves and hard tipped shoes or boots, safety glasses. Splitting wood is far better than paying to go to a gym.
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Heres another question. Birch splits along its grain so easy I was thinking it would be best used for making kindling and smaller sticks rather than burning in junks. Any opiniuons?

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wrote:

Not familiar with birch but it is a good idea to google up the fuel value of various woods. The hard woods are usually best. I think some like fat wood which is from a high resin pine stump makes good fire starter but burning a lot of pine is a no no because of high creosote build up.
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Old wives tale. If the pine is cured well dthere is no creosote problem any worse than any other wood, assuming one isn't burrning with an oxygen starved fire. There are mny places where you heat with pine, fir, spruce or you don't heat with wood at all.
Harry K
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Easy is good.
Hickory is a bear to split so leave that in big chunks to burn all night. Red oak splits pretty clean.
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where can i find pictures of bark to see what types of wood i have only one i know is birch!

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On 10/4/2011 12:54 PM, don &/or Lucille wrote:

Not that easy to figure out. Saw from this site: http://www.keep-it-simple-firewood.com/firewood-types.html That there are 4 different types of birch, couple burn good, couple poor. Don't know what are predominant woods in your area and agree with cite that says you should use trusted supplier. My tree guy cut down a silver maple years ago and I saved $50 to keep the wood. Was a bear to split and burned poorly. If it were good he would have taken it to sell as firewood, but he does not sell crap.
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On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 13:54:36 -0300, "don &/or Lucille"

A few pictures of bark aren't going to tell you much. Can't/won't the guy you bought it from tell you what it is?
It is pretty likely he'll either say 'I don't know" [which translates to "find yourself another supplier" ]-- or he'll say 'there was birch, maple, oak & poplar in the load I brought you'.
If he admits to selling you poplar, he's a keeper, but tell him you don't need any poplar next time.
Some woods might take a *really* good look at bark texture and color, wood color, grain structure, smell, and weight to tell what it is. If you're in NY, the woods it could be will be a whole lot different from the possibilities an west TX. [I see you have a ca address-- so NS to Yukon]
And though it will be a PITA to learn all the woods that someone might bring you-- if you're going to be buying wood, it is time well spent.
Jim
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This seems untrue. 1. Machines cannot make (at an economical price) a sharp axehead. Only a (skilled) person with a file can render an axe really sharp. 2. Retail stores do not want their stock of axes to be sharp (to avoid accidents in handling, by curious customers etc.)
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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On 10/4/2011 3:50 PM, Don Phillipson wrote:

Fer cryin' out loud! All he wants to do is split logs. He's not planning to *shave* with it.
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Not in the UK-- but that's the easiest way to make 2 pieces of twisted elm separate. I've never worked with cypress, but have heard the same of it.
Makes for difficult firewood-- but good wooden hubs for wagons or furniture pieces that you don't want to split.
Hickory is pretty resistant- but splittable when seasoned unless you've got a chunk of crotchwood.
Jim
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Investigate buying a machine driven hydraulic wood splitter. We just split 7 tons of firewood this past week, and will go this coming week and get another three. Yes, they are a little spendy. And I know that there are those who say that manual splitting is better, easier, and much cheaper. All I know is that my right arm still works fine, and that's all I need to run it. I cannot use an axe or maul or hammer due to multiple orthopedic problems and a slight bit of laziness. New, today, a good one is $1500. Used ones can be had for less than that, and in this economy, I'd believe I could find a decent slightly used one for around $500.
Splitting wood is hard dangerous work no matter what you use. A member of our family just had three amputated fingers reattached two weeks ago in a 12 hour surgery. He was splitting wood on a tractor powered splitter, and something went wrong. I just think that a motorized splitter may be a little safer, even in light of his accident. Teenager.
Assess your capabilities and do what you think best. Lots of people have died splitting wood and shoveling snow. It's a sure way to find out how good your heart is working, any means you use.
The machine is infinitely faster and easier.
Good luck.
Steve
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