Splitting a land parcel - how?

I am interested in acquiring a land parcel about 32000 SF and cut it into three lots and sell off two of them and build a house for myself on the largest lot. What is the procedure in doing this? How do I create three separate parcels with different addresses is there a standard procedure involved?
Thanks,
MC
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
it can be a big hassle, see your local town offices.
there are minimum lot size rules, fees for sub dividing, rules about sewers or they will require you get the entire parcel perk tested for septic:( rules about curb cuts, the list can be endless, depending on where exactly the property is.
All this costs big bucks, a good friend did it and had to post a 11 grand bond to cover the cost of a future serer line to serve the sub divided parcel.
you will almost certinally need a lawyer to get this all done perfect.
good luck you will need it.
my in laws bought 3 lots in a subdivision, all have irregular shapes to meet perk test rules...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
miamicuse wrote:

The standard procedure is to go to your local building and zoning department and see if you are allowed to do it. If so, they will tell you what division they would approve.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I am doing something similar. My lawyer said it would cost maybe $500. Naturally your three lots will have to satisfy the zoning requirement.s
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 18 Mar 2006 20:40:58 -0500, "miamicuse"

Get a parcel number and check with Dade County Records...(online) presuming you are in Miami. Any previous division by a developer may reflect some zoning issues...agriculture, wet lands, etc.. BTW, how did you find land in Miami?
Oren "My doctor says I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fiber, and that I am therefore excused from saving Universes."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

No more land in Miami, this one has a tiny house sitting on it, so that needs to be torn down.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
why not offere the house for a buck to anyone who will remove it? saves demolition and might be a useful home to someone.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's called a "Re-Plat" if I'm not mistaken. Assuming all the lots will satisfy the local codes, homeowner's assoc. covenants, etc... it's fairly straitforward. A lawyer is recommended to put the paperwork through for you. Before retaining an attorney however, take the advice previously given and get with your local building codes office and ensure you can even do it first. No sense paying a lawyer to tell you it can't be done. Cheers, cc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The most important considerations are what the lot is zoned for, what the minimum lot size is, what size houses you could then build on those lots, and having street access for all the lots. Then you have issues of meeting setback, sideyard, etc. reqts for all the lots. If it turns out all this is OK, then it should be pretty straightforward.
If you can't meet all the requirements, then to split the property, you will need a variance. And that's up to the local Board of Adustment, or similar body. Whether they grant it depends on how extreme the variance deviates from zoning, whether it's some type of hardship case, if the neighbors support the idea or object, who you know, and what mood the board is in. If you need to go this route, the cost will be much higher, win or lose, because they typically want more site plans, info, you may need expert witnesses, etc.
As others have suggested, find out from the city what it's zoned for and the various requirements for that zone. You can do a first pass on your own to figure out if there are any immediate show stoppers without spending any money, except maybe to buy a copy of the zoning book.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The lot is currently zoned for single family residence, and all adjacent lots are about 12000 SF and this one is slightly over 37000 SF. It has a frontage of about 250' to one side so access is not a problem. I guess I have to check the plans to see how the water sewer lines are laid for the current house and if it connects in a strange angle it may affect how I can split it?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sub-plat is the commonly used term out west anyway.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

First you do your homework. Check with the Town, describe your intentions, get a feel for the likelihood of acceptance. Make sure you understand all of the requirements for application and approval. Make a list of the information and documentation you need to submit an application. Second, assuming a successful first step, hire a land surveyor to draw up the plans for review and approval, and later for recording. Third, submit the plans to the town for subdivision approval. Forth, hire a lawyer to record the approved plans and write up the new deeds.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In addition to what everyone else said, you should contact the utility companies in the area (Water, gas, electric) to find out if providing service to the new lots is possible.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

into
three
Good point. Thanks,
MC
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In addition to what everyone else said, you should contact the utility companies in the area (Water, gas, electric) to find out if providing service to the new lots is possible.
ADD SEWAGE TO THAT LIST!
Around here some areas are out of capacity and dont allow new hookups or charge outlandish fees like 18 grand to connect to their lines
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That is what lawyers are for.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.