Split Receptacle GFI outlet. Do they exist?

Page 1 of 2  

Got a 15 amp split receptable mounted on a studded basement wall for a washing machine and gas dryer. I want to install a laundry tub about 4 feet away. Code here says that outlet has go to be gfci (1.5 metres or about 4.5 feet from the "sink") but I cannot find any 15 amp split receptacle gfi outlets. The wire is 14/3 so I can't do like the kitchen 20 amp near the sinks...
are there 15 amp gfi split receptacle outlets? I see none available in my juistiction (ontario)... Is this because it has to be gfi at the breaker and not allowed at the outlet?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's probably because they can't fit all the electronics into the size of a receptacle. You could change the box to a double and install two gfci outlets, or if you have piles of money to blow, you could get a double pole 15 amp gfci with neutral circuit breaker
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's a single 14/3 wire. How do I wire that single splt receptacle into two receptacle in a single double box?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

neutral is white correct? so I run a shoirt pig tail from one recpet to the other. Red wire goes hot onto first recept and black wire goes hot into recpt number 2? anything about the grounding I would have to consider? I can use gfi outlets using this scenario?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You got it, and just ground both receptacles as you would normally

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

re: "if you have piles of money to blow, you could get a double pole 15 amp gfci with neutral circuit breaker"
RBM...serious question...since you know a lot more about this than me...
Everybody's idea of a "pile" is different.
This link shows a 15 amp 2 pole GFCI breaker for $25.
http://www.electricsuppliesonline.com/ge-thqb2115-circuit-breaker.html
Do you consider that a "pile of money" or is that not the type of breaker you were referring to?
Wouldn't 2 GFCI's, a double box and face plate cost close to that - and take a lot more work to install?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

re: "if you have piles of money to blow, you could get a double pole 15 amp gfci with neutral circuit breaker"
RBM...serious question...since you know a lot more about this than me...
Everybody's idea of a "pile" is different.
This link shows a 15 amp 2 pole GFCI breaker for $25.
http://www.electricsuppliesonline.com/ge-thqb2115-circuit-breaker.html
Do you consider that a "pile of money" or is that not the type of breaker you were referring to?
Wouldn't 2 GFCI's, a double box and face plate cost close to that - and take a lot more work to install?
The breaker you link to is just a standard 2 pole 15 amp. If you scrounge around that site, you'll find the 2 pole 15 amp gfci, which is $145
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Crabby website! The page for the GFCI breaker shows a picture and specs on the GFCI breaker on top and then a table of part numbers just below that. I clicked on the 15 amp 1-pack and didn't even realize it had taken me to a totally different page.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As far as I know, they don't exist.
Here are some thoughts:
1 - Any reason you can't use one GFCI for both? Why is the current outlet split? I've been running a washing machine and gas dryer off of a single 15 amp receptacle for years. It's on the same circuit as the receptacle we use to iron. We've never had a problem using all three appliances at the same time.
2 - How hard would it be to add a second receptacle (2 GFCI's) in the same location?
3 - Why not leave the current receptacle in place and use a 2 pole GFCI breaker?
http://www.electricsuppliesonline.com/ge-thqb2115-circuit-breaker.html
4 - I've heard of this solution, although I'll say right up front that I don't know if it's code compliant - or could be made code compliant by ganging 2 breakers:
Install 2 GFCI's someplace else and wire the top of the split to one GFCI and the bottom to the other. Again, I don't know if that is doable per code, but I've heard of it being done to split receptacles in a kitchen.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Too late. It's already wired 14/3. The reason this is split receptacle is the washing machine is a 4.6 cubic foot front load machine that has a 1100 w heating element as well. It's some sort of futuristic front loading NASA type bullshit appliance that claims it's more efficient to heat water while it washes rather than pull warm water from the water tank. In fairness the this washer uses 15 gallons or water per full load of laundry rather than the typical 50 gallons and it averages at least 1 hour per load instead of the typical 35 minutes per load. The washing machine calls for 11A
The really large gas dryer calls for 6 A. GE appliances of Canada actually recommends in it book that these two appliances if used in a pair must either be on a 20 amp circuit or two 15 amp circuits.

Not hard. Would have to find a current circuit and have it end for the dryer maybe since it only maxes 6 amps (I can do this myself) or easily;\ snake new wire to the panel box for one of the many empty breakers but I am deathly afraid of touching wires in my own panel boxes and would have to call an electrician to wire into the box because of my fear. However it is currently 14-3 wire right now at the split. What do I do with the red wire

easiest solution at this point.

Our panel box is getting changed as we speak. An electrical inspector is inspecting all work \before the utility is allow to turn electricity back on. If it's grey area for code, we could be in trouble....
Number 3 is the best bet right now......
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Moot point I just found out. Ge Appliances of Canada answered my email in 35 minutes time about the use of GFI/GFCI for their gas dryer. They do NOT recommend any of their large appliances, esp gas stoves, gas ranges and gas dryers be used with gfi because the igniters in these appliances will always have a small "leak to ground" that will trip the gfi. In their email they also included water softeners, microwaves and teevee monitors not be connected to gfi.
so much for all of our ideas. :( Sorry for getting everyone all worked up on my question....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

manufacturers recommendations

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The only code I could find was that any outlet within 4.5 feet (1.5 meters) near a sink or tub must be gfci protected. There are specific instructions for small bathrooms. The new laundry tub is 3 foot 6 from the outlet, whatever that is in the metric system they use here.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Stupid question...if you move the outlet 1 foot will the cords still reach?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/16/2010 9:20 PM, The Henchman wrote:

actually, anything with a motor should not be plugged into a gfci.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Outdated conventional wisdom.
Current version: motor appliance manufacturers need to build their motors so that the leakage current is low enough not to trip a 5ma GFCI. I think the UL standard may be 0.5ma allowable leakage current, not sure.
Cheers, Wayne
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

GE's email response seem to focus on the gas igniters of their appliance more than anything maybe maybe that's because they custom answered my question.
Here's a question for you. I have a 15 amp outdoor gfi outlet that I want to use power tools on such as 13 amp table saws and 15 cicrular saws and the like. what potential leak to ground can be from those motors?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Wayne's point, at least in the US, the manufacturers are responsible for building their stuff to the latest safety standards, so they will work reliably with gfci protection

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RBM wrote:

Or, conversely, the code probably wouldn't be changed to not work with the way equipment is built.
I agree with RBM and Wayne.
Temporary receptacles at construction sites generally have to be GFCI protected. The power tools used by construction workers better not trip a GFCI.
Receptacles for 15/20A 120V refrigerators and freezers in commercial kitchens have to be GFCI protected.
It would be easy to construct a spark ignitor on the secondary of a transformer, so there is no ground leakage on the supply wires.
--
bud--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.