Specify/Install Sump Pit and Sump Pump

Re: Specify/Install Sump Pit and Sump Pump
Greetings,
I have (of necessity) just discovered alt.home.repair. It looks very interesting.
I inhabit a small brick bungalow, built in 1954, poured-concrete foundation, about 800 square feet. Perhaps twice a year we get hard/fast rains (i.e. 3" in 12 hours) which cause a hydrostatic water problem in the basement. The water "pushes up" from underneath the basement floor.
I've a spare bedroom down there. And a workshop. And utilities and storage, etc, and several rugs. Need to eliminate the water problem.
I need to specify/install both a sump pit and a sump pump. I am modestly competent (not expert) at such DIY projects.
I've scoured the net and talked to numerous home-improvement type folks and about all of substance I've found is:
http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/rm_plumbing_drain_disposal/article /0,1797,HGTV_3773_1385954,00.html
but it lacks all manner of detail. It also suggests a 5 gal. bucket for a pit lining, but I'm told that submersible pumps require more clearance for the switch.
Questions:
1.) How critical is the location of the pit? I've some limitations and am thinking of locating it very close to the stack and drain. 2.) How can I cut the hole for the pit? I drilled a 1/2" hole in the basement floor: the concrete appears to be about 2" thick. For all I know, if I went after it with a sledge hammer, the floor could crack along the length of the house. There should be 6" of gravel fill on the outside edge of the pit lining? Another 6" under the lining? Etc, etc. 3.) Can I run the sump discharge to the stack (code permitting)? To the drain? How? 4.) What make/model of pump? I estimate that the pump would run for perhaps 36 hours/year or a bit less. 5.) What are the potential issues with the check valve? One often has to drill a special hole to get them to work properly? Thumbnail sketch of such issues?
As regards 4.) and 5.), I'm told that Little Giant makes an inclusive pit-liner/sump ("Drain Pump Kit") unit. I see Teel (#4RK74) and Zoeller (#2P778) units in the Grainger catalog for around $225. They are not described as sump pump systems but might work OK? Are these a good bet?
It's such a lite-duty application that I'm not above adapting the 5-gal. plastic pickle bucket that's been sitting in my garage for years <grin>. But is there a pump/switch unit that will fit in the 10.5" diameter bottom of the bucket?
Any/all help/suggestions would be much appreciated.
Cheers, Puddin'
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Replies in-line:
Puddin' Man wrote:

I think it's iffy that a bucket in a pit is going to be effective in draining ground water coming under the floor from god-knows-where. The lip of the bucket will need to be below the concrete (unless you only plan to drain whatever water appears on *top* of the concrete.
2.) How can I cut the hole for the pit? I drilled a 1/2"

If you drill (swiss-cheese) the floor in the shape of the bucket, you can easily sledge hammer the hole.

Ask your bldg inspector, but I say, "No!". Ground water is not permitted into the sanitary sewer. If you do do it, there are questions to be asked about a trap and vent and check valve.

You can drill a small hole in the dischg pipe in the pit; that will allow water to drain back.

There *are* some small pumps which will fit in a pickle bucket. They have a float which slides on a rod. True Valu has one.
The big disadvantage of the small bucket is that the pump will cycle frequently, shortening life. Frequent pump noise may be irritating too.

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---snip----

I should have mentioned that holes are to be drilled in the pit liner. I thought this was SOP.
For instance, if the liner were 14" tall, I could start drilling holes 4" from the top, and stop drilling 4" from the bottom. The liner would then begin filling when the water level was 10" below the top of the floor (about 8" below the bottom).
But I can't find specs on any of this stuff ...

This occurred to me. Short of renting a $60/day wet concrete saw, this may be the way to go.

I live in a big, nasty city. Our rainwater and sewage systems are integral. I've seen it done here. I'll ask an inspector anyway.

You mean between the pump and the check valve? Have you done this?
I don't understand this issue.

This is a pedastal pump. Preferable to a submersable?

You have installed pit/sump systems? What would you recommend for an 800 sq. foot house that doesn't draw much water??
Thanks, Puddin'
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Puddin' Man wrote:

Don't know of spcs for this. I was concerned about how the ground water has to migrate from where it comes up over to where the sump will be (picture the flow under the concrete floor).

Might be allowed then. Ask specifics on traps, venting, and check valve.

See: http://www.zoeller.com/zcopump/TechSupport/faq.htm

They carry a submersible too. Here's a Flotec with vertical float: http://www.tool-universe.com/f/Flotec/Flotec_1_2_HP_Ironmate_reg_Submersible_Sump_Pump_Model_FPS4550A_200040024.htm just as an example.

The bucket may work fine. You'll have to experiment to see what the flow is.

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