Special Device to heat florescent bulbs in winter

I have come up with an idea to heat florescent bulbs in the winter, so they work in the cold. What I did was take a clear plastic and encase the whole fixture, allowing only a small hole on each end. Then I took some steel conduit and ran it into one end of the plastic covering the bulb and fixture. On the other end of the steel pipe, I have a hair dryer.
Here is how it works. I go into my unheated garage about 1/2 hour before I really want to work in there. I plug in the hair dryer and turn it on. The heated air blows thru the pipe, which goes up to the plastic surrounding the florescent fixture. The heated air blows thru the plastic and exits out the other end. In the process the bulb and fixture are warmed. One half hour later they are warm enough to turn them on, and the bulb lights just like it does in the summer.
Caution, be sure the steel pipe is long enough so the plastic dont start on fire, but not so long that the air is cold by the time it gets to the bulb. My pipe is about 6 feet long. I run the hair dryer on medium heat. So far my biggest problem is the plastic melting where the pipe enters when I had the hair dryer on high. The other problem is the plastic tends to come off because the hot air causes the tape to release.
My next plan is to run the heated air directly into a knockout on the end of the fixture. This will heat the ballast well, but I am afraid not the bulb. I am looking into a solution for that. I also have plans to insulate the pipe with fiberglass, and switch to flex pipe so I can mount it to the wall, instead of sitting right in the center of my workbench.
Now that I have proven this works, I need to simplyfy the whole thing.
Final note. I keep the hair dryer upright by placing it in my vice. I have the pipe clamped to a piece of steel screwed to my workbench, just ahead of the hair dryer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hmm let's see. a 1200 watt dryer for 1/2 hour = 600wh
a compact fluorescent = 18 w times 5 hoursa = 90wh
incandescent bulb = 75 w times 5 hours = 325wh
OK, so, what't the point???
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It's not a compact florescent, its a dual bulb 48 inch bench light above my workbench.
Yes, I agree there is more energy used, but I cant see well on my workbench with just the ceiling bulb. like to see what I am doing when I work on stuff.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@my.com wrote:

-snip-
So buy a $15 cold weather flourescent before you burn your garage down. I'll bet it will pay for itself in less than 100 hours of your jerry-rigged fire hazard.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Better yet, just buy a florescent fixture and lamps designed for the cold. Better light, less noise, increased safety and easier.
However you could make your device and sell in on late night TV and make big money. You could even offer a free set of special rags to wipe the dust off the lamps if you they place their order right now! ;-)
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
LOL. Thanks, you just made my day. I'm rolling over with laughter. You should publish this one.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
or turn the light on .5 hours before you need it and let the light heat itself up?
Unless you mean the light doesn't come on at all. in which case, get the cold weather bulbs/fixture as suggested.
The only "cold weather" effects i've had were that I had to touch the bulb to get it to light, and it's dim untill it's been on for a little while.
Perhaps I've been lucky.
--
be safe.
flip
Verso l'esterno! Verso l'esterno! Deamons di ignoranza.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

that's great, run a 1000 watt hair drier for 30 minutes to warm up a 20 watt bulb. wouldn't it be cheaper to just have an incandescent bulb instead?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You guys got way too much time on your hands! LOL!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
According to <The Newsgroup>:

This seems a trifle excessive.
I had a much simpler/cheaper idea, but I haven't tried it.
Rewire the fixtures so that they have both the switched 120V to the fixture, PLUS a second switched 120V line that powers one or two 7 watt sockets (eg: small clear Xmas lights) fastened close to the ballast. Install 7 watt bulbs in sockets.
Preheat by switching on the 7 watt bulbs. After you turn on the mains, switch off the "preheat". Ideally, put a timer switch on the "preheat" so that you can't run the preheat more than 10-15 minutes.
I don't know whether you have to preheat the tubes or not. I suspect not (or not much).
Fire risk? Maybe. You're on your own there.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.