Special blade for cutting vinyl tile ?


I am working on a vinyl tile job.
Using Armstrong 12x12 tiles.
Been using a fine sable saw blade, but I can't get consistent cuts.
The material seems to melt instead of cut and it's somewhat fragile.
Any tips?
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/20/2010 8:24 AM, Andy wrote:

I've never worked with vinyl tile cutters but as a retired polymer chemist know that special tools are usually needed as friction can generate enough heat to melt plastic making job difficult.
Google up vinyl tile cutters for plenty of answers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andy wrote:

Knife, straight edge, score, break, file smooth.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Umm yeah... Try a utility knife and a package of new sharp blades...
If you are trying to use a power saw to cut these tiles, you are using the wrong tool... Use a fresh utility knife and a straight edge to make straight cuts going free hand to make cuts around tight corners or curves... Aviation snips can come in handy for some cuts...
If you have a lot of straight cuts to make to install a vinyl tile floor you could either buy or rent a vinyl tile shear...
~~ Evan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've used a big old paper cutter with some success. Seemed to work cleanest with the pattern side up. Harbor Freight (natch!) has larger sizes at reasonable prices. Much faster and safer than messing with utility knives. Even made a hole punch out of some sharpened EMT conduit for going around pipes. Takes a couple of blows with the mallet to neatly slice through most tiles. Old fashioned tin snips do fairly well if you keep them sharp.
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

sizes at reasonable prices. Much faster and safer than messing with utility knives. Even made a hole punch out of some sharpened EMT conduit for going around pipes. Takes a couple of blows with the mallet to neatly slice through most tiles. Old fashioned tin snips do fairly well if you keep them sharp.
I use "new fashion" snips designed for use with Al flashing. They have long handles, are made from some lightweight metal (Al?) and have steel inserts on the cutting edges.
I use utility knives for streight cuts. I just score one side and bend the tile. It ALWAYS breaks right at the score line. You can make a score line as fast as you can mark the tile.
I can see two problems with a paper cutter: 1) it's BIG; & 2) it doesn't have the leverage of the snips. But if it works for you ...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

An 18" paper cutter has a 20" handle. Honestly, do your snips have handles that long? <G>
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

"An 18" paper cutter has a 20" handle. Honestly, do your snips have handles that long? <G>
No, they don't. They are on the order of 10" long.
But you don't understand the concept of leverage.
It's not just the lenght of your end of the lever but also how far the "load" is from the pivot point. In a paper cutter it's a minimum of 2 to 3". It's about 12" at the maximum.
With the "snips," it's about 1" minimum and 4" maximum.
YMMV
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks to all for their input.
I ended up using a sheetrock knife with FREQUENT blade changes.
For closets and odd shapes, some wire cutters helped too.
Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.