Speaking of ionizers...

Just saw a Pat Murphy Stark (cute blond, 'Miss NYS' winner in 1990) direct marketing TV ad for the AirForceIonizer. Claims to do what the larger, more expensive ionizers, like the Sonic Breeze, do. Sells for $50, but if you act now, $10 for two. :-) Cleaned all smoke from a fish tank in 6 minutes. Nothing about cleaning it though. Perhaps it's a throwaway. No Google links for AirForceIonizer.
--
Bill

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willshak wrote:

How big of a fish tank, 20 gallons?
So about 5000 more of those, and you can "clean" the air in your house in 20 days!
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On 1/7/2005 1:09 PM US(ET), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

Could have been. Not much smaller in volume than the one used in the Sonic Breeze ads when you consider the size of each unit. This unit was much smaller than the SB. Looked about the size of an older cable TV decoder box.

Assuming that the Ionic Breeze (sorry for the previous mis-identification) actually works (and CU says it doesn't), how many of them would you need to do the same thing?
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Bill

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whether or not ionizers provide health benefits can be argued either way
some are effective at removing smoke from the air but can cause particles in the air to "attach to nearby surfaces such as walls or furniture, or attach to one another and settle out of the air" - see below
so the particles are not filtered out and still in the room, no good if the particles are unhealthy
u.s. epa indicates "high efficiency particle filters or electrostatic precipitators" are more efective " in removing particles of dust, tobacco smoke, pollen or fungal spores."
some of what the u.s. epa says about ionizers: from http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/ozonegen.html
"...some ozone generators are manufactured with an "ion generator" or "ionizer" in the same unit. An ionizer is a device that disperses negatively (and/or positively) charged ions into the air. These ions attach to particles in the air giving them a negative (or positive) charge so that the particles may attach to nearby surfaces such as walls or furniture, or attach to one another and settle out of the air. In recent experiments, ionizers were found to be less effective in removing particles of dust, tobacco smoke, pollen or fungal spores than either high efficiency particle filters or electrostatic precipitators. (Shaughnessy et al., 1994; Pierce, et al., 1996). However, it is apparent from other experiments that the effectiveness of particle air cleaners, including electrostatic precipitators, ion generators, or pleated filters varies widely (U.S. EPA, 1995). "
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would an air ionizer be able to remove the smell of a dead mouse? I get one or two a year that I can't find and the house gets pretty ripe for a week or two.

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possibly but the smell would continually replenish itself so you'd have to run an ionizer continuously until the smell went away anyway, and in the meantime with the ionizer you would have the health concerns mentioned by the epa as to ionizers and if it is also an ozone generator you would have ozone issues as well
any way to use a dog or other smell sensitive animal to locate the dead mice so the decaying carcasses could be removed or otherwise remediated?
or this person uses their nose then cuts a hole in the wall to remove the dead mouse http://www.aaanimalcontrol.com/deadratmouse.htm

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Too bad bluebottle flies aren't sold for that. They head for the source of the smell, wall portion gets removed, carcass taken out, wall repaired.
BTW, the Ionic Breeze got incredibly panned by Consumer's Reports a while back.

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we have a cat but he shows no inclination to find dead things.

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willshak wrote:

So it claims to do next to nothing, but just not charge you as much as the other one does.
About the only thing they really do is to put ozone in the air. Ozone is considered a hazardous material.

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Joseph Meehan

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On 1/7/2005 4:37 PM US(ET), Joseph Meehan took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

Exactly! Why waste hundreds of dollars on the Ionic Breeze when you can waste $10 for two that don't work either?

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Indeed. Some consider canned tuna to be an hazardous material. Still, the minisucule amount Ozone generated by this dude is insignificant.
What one needs is a REAL Ozone generator. The one we use generates 900ug/hr. We could let a dead Flamingo decompose in the same room and never notice the smell.
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