Speaker repair

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I've got a lot of big, small and medium speakers that have blown out over the years. Typically I take them to the attic where they usually make pretty good bookshelf supports.
In the spirit of domestic harmony, I am cleaning out said attic (anyone *really* refer to their old college texts or books they have read in the past anymore?). So with all the books being "de-accessioned" (librarian-speak for "thrown out") I am left with a lot of bowed knotty pine planks and burned out speakers.
If they can be salvaged, I can use them, but if they're likely to just blow out again, I will send them to the curb monster that comes by late at night before trash day.
So my question is this. Is it worth repairing 10 or 20 year old speakers? Can replacements be readily had?
Is there a good site for diagnosing speaker problems? I almost always assume it's a fine wire winding in the voice coil that shorted when a speaker no longer even responds to a battery "click" test but I that's an assumption.
Is it possible to match the characteristics of the old speakers closely enough without manufacturer info like a parts list?
Do crossover networks ever go bad? Can they be tested with a multimeter?
And yes, I googled it,
http://www.google.com/search?q=diagnosing+speaker+problems&btnG=Search
but I didn't like very many of the sites it revealed. I'll keep searching but Google ain't what she used to be.
Hmm, should have added "blown" to the search term - much better. Still not great, though.
Thanks in advance for your input.
--
Bobby G.



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On 5/21/2014 9:49 AM, Robert Green wrote:

...
If'en the books don't get carried away, before throwing out entirely, the local library has a "free" table for the purpose...I've had amazing (to me) stuff disappear from there to at least delay the landfill deluge.
I've no input on the speaker repair per se altho I wonder how one manages to blow "a lot" of them -- I've a set or AR-5 and 3a's from 50 yr ago and haven't ever "blown" one other than a car or tractor radio 5" jobbie...
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On Wed, 21 May 2014 10:49:50 -0400, "Robert Green"

If it was me, I'd just toss them. But..... http://www.instructables.com/id/Fixing-an-Old-Speaker-A-DIY-Guide-to-Improving-Yo/
What's wrong with those instructions? But, if it was me I'd toss them. See if you can salvage the knotty pine.
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Robert Green wrote:

I can't speak to your specific repairs, but I have repaired speakers for my car that had the broken rubber around the cone. The kit was cheap and easy to install.
Simply Speakers.
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badgolferman wrote:

It all depends. What kinda speakers(music, instrument, size, etc.) They all can be repaired. Voice coil can be re[placed, even impedance changed. Cones replaced, ribbed or smooth cones, rubbers can be redone,etc. I had a blown 15 in. keyboard amp speakers. I had it repaired, recone, new voice coil, etc. for 80.00.
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dpb wrote:

So far I've blown 2 sets of rear speakers on my Harley - might have something to do with high volume levels coupled with "optomistic" power-handling specs . Oh , and the 100 watt amp in the tourpak .
--
Snag



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Robert,
It's probably not cost effective to repair the speakers. To repair a speaker it helps to know what's wrong, so let's open it up. What do you see? 2 speakers or 3 maybe? A PC board? A fuse? Now what sort of tools do you have? A multimeter? An oscilloscope? A soldering iron? Ok let's hook the speaker up to a good audio signal. Turn the volume down and the power on. Now bring the volume up. Hear anything?
Dave M.
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Anything can be fixed, almost anything, if the speakers were high dollar than repair'em, I'm still old school when a decent set of speakers were high dollar, they still are if you want real quality. So fix them up like new and use them or put them back in the attic or you might read up on acoustics and remove the speakers and put them in the wall or ceiling. google infinite baffle, You'll find lots of information and parts available on the internet, one of many.... http://www.speakerworks.com/speaker_repair_kits_s/65.htm
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On Wednesday, May 21, 2014 7:49:50 AM UTC-7, Robert Green wrote:

Question is better answered in the sci.electronics.repair newsgroup.
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More to the point, I think:
What brand of speakers are they?
If they're a pair of Pioneer HPM-60's, they're probably not worth repairing.
If they're a pair of BOSE 901's, then you'll find some sucker on ebay that will pay through the nose for them (no highs, no lows, must be bose).
A pair of Infinity QE's, should be fixable (and may just have a blown fuse).
If they're a pair of Maggies, get 'em fixed!
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Rubber usually does not rot, and it's not regular rubber. There are three basic surround types.

Too many drivers, but solid cabs.

Probably did not get blown out, but may have fallen out. For what it's worth, I know a lot about these.

It's funny the OP seems to be ignoring posting pictures or makes. Maybe we got some Sound Design goodies. fishers ?
I've built many speakers, and have fixed many. It's not usually quick and easy fix.
I can't cross post.
Greg
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I suspect there's every type of damage a speaker can suffer from torn cones to open voice coils and probably failed cross-over networks.
--
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Good idea, I'll crosspost the original item so that both groups can weigh in. AHR folks, please forgive the second posting!
--
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They're OK - I think I need a little more info on how to test crossover networks because I think at least some of them are bad - i.e. the speakers will sound connected to an amp directly but not when connected to the crossover network in the box. However there were some useful bits.

I can make use of them if I can repair them and in some cases, would have to buy new ones. Not sure of the tradeoff but I will be moreso when I price replacements. If it's anything like drill batteries, I can buy a new drill and battery packs on sale for the price of a single replacement battery pack.

Just flip them and load them down with some bricks to recurve them against the bowing. It really wasn't bad compared to the one particle board shelf that sagged like a pregnant cow.
--
Bobby G.



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I've got a lot of big, small and medium speakers that have blown out over the years. Typically I take them to the attic where they usually make pretty good bookshelf supports.
In the spirit of domestic harmony, I am cleaning out said attic (anyone *really* refer to their old college texts or books they have read in the past anymore?). So with all the books being "de-accessioned" (librarian-speak for "thrown out") I am left with a lot of bowed knotty pine planks and burned out speakers.
If they can be salvaged, I can use them, but if they're likely to just blow out again, I will send them to the curb monster that comes by late at night before trash day.
So my question is this. Is it worth repairing 10 or 20 year old speakers? Can replacements be readily had?
Is there a good site for diagnosing speaker problems? I almost always assume it's a fine wire winding in the voice coil that shorted when a speaker no longer even responds to a battery "click" test but I that's an assumption.
Is it possible to match the characteristics of the old speakers closely enough without manufacturer info like a parts list?
Do crossover networks ever go bad? Can they be tested with a multimeter?
And yes, I googled it,
http://www.google.com/search?q=diagnosing+speaker+problems&btnG=Search
but I didn't like very many of the sites it revealed. I'll keep searching but Google ain't what she used to be.
Hmm, should have added "blown" to the search term - much better. Still not great, though.
Thanks in advance for your input.
(Followups to alt.home.repair please!)
--
Bobby G.




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I do, on rare occasion.
You presumably have conventional dynamic speakers. It's unlikely any of them could stand up to current models in terms of sound quality. (There are exceptions.)
The fact that these speakers are "blown out" is suspicious. Speakers are almost always blown out by gross abuse; it doesn't "just happen". As a "classical snob" listener, I'm tempted to believe you don't deserve to own good speakers, because you just crank up the volume without regard for whether you're driving the speakers into distortion, a small step away from damaging them.
Before repairing or replacing these speakers, you should find out /why/ you're abusing them.
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On 5/21/2014 7:29 PM, William Sommerwerck wrote:

WHAT!
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On 5/21/2014 9:05 PM, amdx wrote:

If your attic is anything like mine with regard to temperature and humidity control, hitting extremes in both parameters, I would caution you to look carefully at the outcome of storage. You may find that new issues now exist which did not arise until heat, cold, dust, etc. have destroyed other elements of the speaker. The adhesives, rubber, surrounds, electrolytics, cones, etc. can get irreversibly damaged after a stay in harsh conditions.
Smarty
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"Smarty" wrote in message

Absolutely valid points. But he said these speakers were blown out before being put in storage.
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On 5/21/2014 11:01 PM, William Sommerwerck wrote:

unexpected issues. Expecting a speaker which was 'blown out' with a fried voice coil on the woofer may surprisingly reveal, after storage, an inoperative tweeter, damaged by attic heat.
My point in posting this caveat was to caution the original poster that the condition of the speaker when it was put into attic storage may not reflect the current status due to the attic environment itself.
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