Spalling chimney bricks


Hi all - I'm new to this forum and was hoping that you could all educate me about spalling chimney bricks. I'm in the process of buying a SFH. The home inpsection that I had done stated "many spalled bricks on chimney. A licensed and insured professional chimney contractor should be called to fully evaluate the chimney and flue and the remaining chimney and fireplace components and make all repairs as needed -HEALTH AND SAFETY CONCERN."
I had given the sellers an addendum to the contract stating this, which the owners agreed to and signed. Since then, the oners had a specialist out and the specialist said the spalling of the bricks is cosmetic and no health and safetyconcernr is present. (They quoted a price of $2900 for the top 8 feet of the chimnety to be fixed.) Sine the specialist said that it's cosmetic, the owners are refusing to fix it. Are the spalling bricks really not a concern? Is that all there really is to it? They are using the "health & safety concern" as a loophole not to fix it. Thoughts? Comments?
Thanks in advance!
NAL
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24 Oct 2006 17:47:50 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

It's not a health and safety concern. If the chimney and flue were affected then it might be. At worst spalling bricks can cause a roof leak. Check that out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi - thanks for the quick reply. As a matter of fact, the flashing around the chimney became unattached due to the spalling and water did leak into the attic. If those bricks aren't fixed & the flashing is again 'sealed' to that same brick, how does it remain sealed with the possibility of the brick continuing to fall apart?
snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It doesn't. Once it is evident that the bricks are spalling they will continue. The best and easiest fix is to cover the chimney with siding. If you see new siding in he future do the chimneys also.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
EVERYTHING is NEGOTIABLE!
Obviously this MUST be fixed
Is it a working chimney for a fireplace or just a furnace hot water tank chimney. How old ios the home? All brick chimney or flue liner? Did the contractor camera inspect the interior or just look from the ground?
Try telling the seller you will split the cost of repairs..........
how is the general condition of the remainder of the home.
if they are motivated sellers they will likely split the cost of repairs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

******************************************* The house is 36 years old. It is a wood burning fireplace with a terra cotta liner that is fine. The overall condition of the house is relatively good. They are replacing the gas furnace along with a bunch of other smaller electrical/plumping issues.
You say it MUST be fixed - what argument can I give them since it's not safety/health concern (even if trying to convince them to split the cost)?
Thanks all for your help!!!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The quick fix would be to clean the bricks tuck point any loose jont mateial and stucco over them using a proper bonding adheasive. This would stop the progression of the deterioration for good if the inside is indeed ok.
NAL wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As long as the inside flue is in good shape, it is not a problem. They did the right thing is having it checked out. Bricks can spall on the outside, but it does not mean there are safety concerns.
What you now have to do is decide if the house is still worth what you were willing to pay and have it repaired at your cost if you don't like it. We can't help with that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote in

Being just a professional Wanna-Be, I had never heard of the term spalling. Interesting subject. Of course I have seen white bricks & white flakey bricks over time.
I recall seeing post about efflorescence, the white junk (pro jargon) on brick and concrete but this is much different than flaking concrete and brick.
Did a bit of reading on all this.
Bricks on my chimney all look absolutely fine but I did notice while up there that the cement or whatever it is on top has a lot of cracks and chips. At the prices in the thousands for even small amounts of chimney repairs, something tells me I need to go up and do something. Article leads me to believe
    http://www.askthebuilder.com/B92_Chimney_Crown_and_Cap_Construction.shtml
I have to chip away all the cement (probably wrong kind) and use real concrete mix. Type-s high strength Sakrete mortar mix is NG??
Also says a gap MUST be left between the concrete and flu and caulked. Maybe like with that grey Henry 900 polyurethane or an equivalent PL brand.
Other articles:     http://www.askthebuilder.com/092_Chimney_Crown_Repairs.shtml     http://www.askthebuilder.com/B95_Brick_and_Masonry_Water_Repellents.shtml
On another note, being made aware of spalling I just happened to look at my neighbors chimney top. Even from across the street I see a lot of white there. I guess this could be efflorescence but being right at the cap it could be trouble. None of my business but it's a curious thing now. Getting up there would provide answers but have a gander at:
    
http://i14.tinypic.com/29utugj.jpg
Thanks, Al...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.