Source of high-wattage fluorescent w/ candelabra base?

I bought a ceiling fan and light fixture for my bedroom and it has a single candelabra fixture allowing a 60 watt incandescent. I had been planning to put a higher equivalent fluorescent bulb in before the laws changed all the fixtures to candelabra bases, so now I'm having trouble finding such a bulb. Are any bulbs available that go above 15 watt (60 watt equivalent) in this base?
Here's the fan I've got:
http://www.westinghouseceilingfans.com/fan_pop-up/78144.html
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Ikea sells compact fluorescent lamps with edison, medium and candelabra bases. Or you could cheat and use a candelabra to Edison adapter. Or a candelabra to medium adapter, if you want to use expensive bulbs :-)
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Unfortunately, I don't think so.
I recently purchased some CFLs with candelabra bases from bulbs.com , who seem to have the best selection I've been able to find (at least for mail / web order), and the best they have is 14 watt (claimed 60 watt equivalent). I'm using them in a bathroom fixture that had a row of 40 watt incandescents, so I'm getting more light, but I don't think that will help you.
I have a ceiling fan in the kitchen that used a single 60 watt incandecent in a globular glass enclosure. It had a standard base, so I tried a CFL in it: but there was only one that was small enough to fit inside the glass enclosure. As I recall, it was 30 watts (real), and it helped, but it had a short life: I don't think it was made to run enclosed, and possibly not base up. As a temporary measure I tried another CFL without the glass enclosure, but it was ugly and it also was specifically labeled not for base up operation. In my case, the only long-term solution was to remove the part of the fixture that held the lamp and replace it with a new enclosure that uses two circline flourescents. This gives me a lot more light (and instant on), and it's "flatter" so there is more head room, but this might not be the solution for you.
I went to several stores, and you can get a variety of lighting kits for ceiling fans, but none of them have flourescent lamps. The industry is really very far behind for these fixtures. If you want something, you'll probably have to put something together yourself. I would have used something with a 2D lamp if I could have found one, but the circline (originally intended as direct mounts to the ceiling or wall) worked out well enough for me. Fortunately, I didn't need anything with an ornate style of enclosure.
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p snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote in

Thanks! This sounds very promising.
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At bulbs.com I found this model:
http://www.bulbs.com/eSpec.aspx?ID 296&RefΚndle+%26+Globe&RefIdB&Ref2 =Compact+Fluorescent+Screw-in
10714C (Candelabra Base) 60 Watt Incandescent Equivalent, 14 Watt, 120 Volt Torpedo CFL Bulb
Ordering Code     10714C (Candelabra Base) Product Number     TEC10714C Energy Used     14 Watts Volts     120      Bulb Shape     Torpedo Base     Candelabra (E12) Diameter (in)     2.100 Length (in)     5.400 Average Rated Life (hr)     8,000 Light Output     720 Lumens      Finish     Warm White CRI     84 Color Temperature (Kelvin)
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Don Klipstein wrote:

Considering a "white LED" is actually a colored LED, why the difference?
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The usual white LED is a blue one that a yellowish-glowing phosphor is added to. The phosphor absorbs some of the blue light and converts it to yellowish light. You end up with a mixture of yellowish light and blue light that adds up to white.
The difference in life expectancy is because the phosphor degrades.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote in

Why not use 3 elements (RGB) with appropriate weights to get a better "white"? Is it possible to get all 3 colors on the same chip? (One still might need 4 leads to use separate resistors to trim the contributions from each color. Or the resistors could be fabricated on the same die.)
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On Mon, 17 Dec 2007 16:57:01 -0600, Kenneth Porter

Maybe 3 leads, considering that some 3-color LEDs do it with just 2 (polarity switching). I have some holiday lights that do that. These "color changing" lights have both yellow and blue LEDs in one 2-wire package. Turning on both produces white.
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You can't have a real WHITE LED, since white isn't a single frequency like red, yellow, orange, green, or blue.
A white LED is actually a blue LED, with a yellow phosphor. The combination of blue and yellow looks white. The phosphor may be responsible for the lower life expectancy. I don't know why.
BTW, I have some "color changing" holiday lights. These have blue and yellow LEDS (they have only 2 wires to each LED, so must be connected in reverse-polarity like the red/green ones). When both are lit (AC) you get white.
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