Source of door bottom extension lumber?

I have been tasked with extending an entry door that has been cut too high. I need to add approx 2" to the bottom. The door is a true 1 3/4" thickness and I plan on screwing/glueing the extension prior to filling, sanding and finishing.
The problem I'm finding is locating a material source that is 1 3/4" thick that I can use for the extension.
I'm hoping that others may have encountered this same issue before and recommend what I could use for material? Obviously all the lumber I've found is 1 1/2" thick.
Recommendations please? Thanks
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On 3/25/2012 7:05 AM, snipped-for-privacy@fdcx.net wrote:

A) Go to a hardwood dealer and buy 8/4 or 10/4 stock
B) Laminate two (or more) pieces of thinner material (resorcinol or an epoxy would be good for the purpose; maybe even an application for the awful-otherwise "gorilla" polyurethane glue.
What is the door made of? I'd try to match it, first. If it's painted, not so much an issue but still will want something that doesn't have grossly differing characteristics (like pine tacked onto an oak door, for example).
--
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snipped-for-privacy@fdcx.net wrote:

I'd go for a double layer of 5/4 pine ripped to the thickness of the door. Sand flush once the glue dries.
Jim
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On Sun, 25 Mar 2012 08:05:13 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@fdcx.net wrote:

Ask around your neighbors or co-workers and see if any of them do woodwork as a hobby. The can either cut down one larger piece or laminate two smaller pieces to get exactly what you need. Some lumberyard will do that also, but it can get expensive.
Drill a couple of deep countersinks in the bottom for the screws, glue and screw it in place. Buy a six-pack or case of beer for the guy that made it for you.
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On 3/25/2012 9:14 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote: ...

I use (and recommend using) dowels instead of screws for this purpose.
Several advantages--no metal staining w/ time/weather, no countersink hole or short plug to cover the hole and by far the biggest plus is one can trim the door to fit now and in future w/o worry over hitting the screws and screwing up either a blade or plane.
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Or biscuits, which give you a little more leeway as far as lining the parts up.
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On 3/26/2012 2:19 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

...
Possible and workable, but for this specific purpose (which I have done quite a few times to salvage/modify doors on farm outbuildings in particular(*)) I drill/insert the dowels after gluing on the new piece; I don't try to use them to line up the scab w/ the door. For that I use blocking to clamp against on the surface.
I now have a wide glue-joint shaper cutter; I'm thinking the next time it comes up I'll run it (if I can figure out a way to get the door past the shaper spindle, that is :) ).
(*) I "grew" a 32x80 to 36x80 for the old shop salvaging an old door from the old house that lost its job in a remodel folks did some 50 years ago and had been sitting in a corner in the barn loft ever since... :)
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n.net> wrote:

That's easy.
Cut a glue joint in the scab.
Then cut off a workable piece from the door and cut glue joints in that, both edges, since you'll have to glue it back onto the door.
Then cut off another workable piece from the remaining part door and cut glue joints in that, both edges, since you'll have to glue it back onto the door.
Then cut off another workable piece from the remaining part door and cut glue joints in that, both edges, since you'll have to glue it back onto the door.
Keep cutting off workable pieces and cutting glue joints until you've put the whole door back together.
QED ;-)

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On 3/26/2012 4:22 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote: ...

...
I've done things like that before (not necessarily on purpose!)
<chuckles>
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On Mar 25, 7:05am, snipped-for-privacy@fdcx.net wrote:

Ask the local millwork place to plane a piece of treated board, and then cover it with a big brass kickplate?
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