Source for lead paint?

Anybody know where to buy lead based paint?
To ship inside USA
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I'm curious why you think you need it.
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wrote:

easier than wearing a tinfoil hat ;)
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What are you doing ?
Greg
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uh,...sitting at my PC reading answers to a thread I started on alt.home.repair newsgroup?
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'Robert Macy[_2_ Wrote: > ;3026922']Anybody know where to buy lead based paint?

You won't have to ship it. You can buy it locally, or at least make it from materials you purchase locally.
In the mid-1970's, lead based pigments (which for the most part was primarily the white pigment "lead carbonate") were banned in ARCHITECTURAL paints. But, lead carbonate was never banned in artist's paints, and you can still buy lead carbonate pigment as a powder in any artist's supply store. Just ask for "Flake White" or "Lead White" pigment or paint, whatever they sell. Flake white and lead white are the same thing being sold under two different names.
If they only sell the pigment as a powder, ask if you can order it as a paint. It might come in a tube, but you can just thin it with the recommended thinner and apply it with a brush.
If you buy it as a powder, you might have a bit of difficulty dispersing it in a tint base. That's because the colourants in the paint tinting machine at your local hardware store consist PRIMARILY of different pigments suspended in glycerine, but there's also a dispersant chemical in each colourant to keep the pigment particles dispersed. So, the more colourant you add to your paint, the more dispersant you also add to keep the pigments dispersed. Adding pigment powder alone to a paint without any dispersant could cause problems with the pigments clumping together and making the paint dry to a dull, or even lumpy finish.
The people working in artist supply stores often have university degrees in fine arts like painting. They would know if they sell a dispersant you can use, or if there's something else you can use as a dispersant.
Besides buying a lead white acrylic paint in a tube, another option would be to mix the lead white powder into glycerine, and then mix that slurry into boiled linseed oil. The glycerine will evaporate from the wet film, and once the remaining linseed oil absorbs oxygen from the atmosphere it'll harden up in a few days with the white lead carbonate particles suspended in it very much like the raisins in raisin bread. And, that's all any paint actually is; tiny coloured particles too small to see individually suspended in a transparent or transluscent solid film in sufficient quantity to make that film opaque. To make for a harder and more durable paint, you might try mixing that glycerine based slurry into polyurethane hardwood floor finish instead of boiled linseed oil. I don't see why that wouldn't work, but I've never tried it. Certainly, glycerine won't interfere with the proper film formation of either boiled linseed oil or polyurethane hardwood floor finish, no matter how much you add.
Hope this helps.
PS:
Besides lead carbonate, which was universally used as the high hiding white pigment in architectural paints prior to the mid-1970's, lead oxide was also used as a red pigment in metal primers. I don't know of any other lead based pigments used in architectural paints or the kinds of primers DIY'ers would commonly use.
Since the mid-1970's, the rutile form of titanium dioxide has replaced lead carbonate as the high hiding white pigment in architectural paints. DuPont is one of the largest suppliers of titanium dioxide to the paint manufacturing industry with their "TiPure" line of titanium dioxide pigments. DuPont used to have a truly excellent website which explained the optical principles by which titanium dioxide provided good hide in paint, but I haven't been able to find that site now for years. I expect they took it off the net, but it might still be on the Ti-Pure web site somewhere.
Believe it or not, there was a time I was seriously considering making my own paint to solve a problem with fading I was having in my apartment block. I was planning to buy the super fade resistant pigments like lead carbonate, cadmium yellow, cobalt blue and such from art supply stores and adding them to a latex satin tint base that I could buy at any hardware store to make a super fade resistant paint. I never did that because I found that what I was dealing with wasn't the paint fading after all, but airborne sticking to the cold interior walls of the building, causing the paint to gradually turn darker.
--
nestork


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Thank you!
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