Soundproofing a wall

Greetings, I have a condo that shares a wall with the unit next door. I can hear their dog barking very easily. Would this method work? * Install 1/2" Soundboard (from Home Depot) over existing sheet rock * Install 5/8" fire code sheet rock over Soundboard
I've read that it's best not to use nails, but I might have building code issues that I'll have to adhere to. Is there some method in which nails can be used?
Thanks for reading.
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wrote:

If I understand what soundboard is I don't think your plan will help much. A major source of sound transmission is conduction through the structure (wall studs), so one of the main thing to do is isolate the wall on your side from the structure. Roam around these websites and see if you find anything.
http://www.soundproofing101.com / http://soundproofing.org/infopages/channel.htm
There are some special Z shaped standoffs you use to install/attach the wallboard with isolates it.
jim
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Take a look at this page.
http://www.quietsolution.com/quietrock.html
I'd not like to be your helper as you install 190# 4x8 sheets though. By way of comparison, from my "Gypsum Construction Handbook" the STC rating (a weighted attenuation) of a wall with 16" oc 2x4 studs and 5/8" drywall on each side is 46. Two layers of 1/2" drywall on each side, with one side's drywall mounted on resilient channels and a 3" Thermafiber blanket in the cavity takes you to an STC rating of 59.
RB
jim evans wrote:

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FE wrote:

I would not worry about the nails. A layer or two of additional drywall (heavier is always better) nailed should help. Next step might be a lead sheet covered by drywall.
All this will be for not, if that sound is going around the wall via the attic or through it via some heating openings.
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Joseph E. Meehan

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You really wanna soundproof that wall? drill holes between studs, every 16 inches and fill cavity with sand. It'll be quiet as hell...but your floor joists might snap.

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<< You really wanna soundproof that wall? drill holes between studs, every 16 inches and fill cavity with sand. >>
Why not squirt polyurethane foam into the cavities? There are companies that specialize in that. Might be worthwhile to get a quote. HTH
Joe
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That will block high sounds, but do next to nothing for low ones. You need mass (concrete, sand, ...) to stop sound.
And sound is somewhat like water; if there's a hole (air vent, duct for wires, etc), the sound will go through it.
As most amateur musicians can tell you, soundproofing a room is a difficult thing.
dv
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Joe Bobst wrote:

Foam type stuff, if it is the right stuff, works well at keeping the noise down in a room, but it does not do much to keep it from going through the foam to the next room.
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