soundproof window

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I need detailed instructions on how to apply a soundproofing plug to my window.
Thanks,
Karen
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On Sat, 10 Jul 2004 08:34:57 -0700, KRusso6984 wrote

What the heck is a "soundproofing plug"?
The only way I know how to soundproof a window is to replace the single pane glass with double or triple pane.
I'm open to learning about a "plug", however...
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DaveC
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KRusso6984 wrote:

set up sound proof area in their building.. they sell stuff in a roll that is foam and has points on it like a packing for chicken eggs(sort of) that you apply to areas and this will not let the sound reflect back and keep the area quiet.. make somthing like this and put a frame around it and cover up the window and the noise will quiten down.... its pretty expensive stuff though....
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KRusso6984 wrote:

I have seen things to put over a window, that could be called a plug, but I have never seen one in use, nor know a lot about them.
Most of the time there are a number of options to reduce noise. Are you looking for something more general, like to reduce the noise coming in or going out a window or something specific?
http://www.soundproofing.org /
Note: They are selling the supplies and the available information is based on their products, but overall it is a good source of information and I don't know about quality or prices, but off hand it looks like a good source of otherwise hard to find materials.
Has a lot of good information. I suggest that often people believe a window is THE source of the noise, only to find the problem is more complex than that.
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Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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I need something to block out the sound of my neighbor's barking dog. She has a high pitched yap & our bedroom is next to where she lets the dog out. Thanks.
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You never did try 911, well it works wonders. Try wearing some pants once in a while.
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Is this going to turn into yet another barking dog thread? Eliminate the source.

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No, this isn't another "barking dog" thread. It is a home improvement project.
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KRusso6984 wrote:

Don't limit your work to the window. Noise can pass into your home in some surprising ways.
Windows is one common way. I am assuming you have the windows closed. Next step is to make sure the windows are well air sealed. Noise, especially high pitched, loves to sneak in just like a draft. Thermo pane windows are much better at blocking noise that others. Heavy drapes or special sound reduction materials can also help, see my reference or other such suppliers.
Many times people have secured the window only to find it did not help much. A common problem is the ceiling when there is an attic above. The attic is vented to remove excessive heat and moisture. It also allows a lot of sound in. The ceiling is usually a poor sound barrier. The insulation does little to stop sound. They make special insulation to reduce sound, but it is not very effective. An additional layer of drywall is usually the more effective for the cost.
Any air vents going through the attic and then into the room, are also sound transmitters. You need to work with them.
The outside wall is usually better, but it is large so even a little sound per sq foot can mean a lot in the room. Again an additional layer of drywall can help a lot for not too much money.
As noted, the best choice may be to mitigate it at the source. Neighbors should not need to put up with barking dogs. It is the dog owner's problem and responsibility to resolve it. Most areas have laws about it for those neighbors who don't want to live up to their responsibilities.
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Joseph E. Meehan

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Even active noise reduction devices are most functional below 1kHz. http://anr.econgo.com/?BODY=home.esl &
He needs to either look for the name Smith & Wesson, or check for the nonemergency number for the police.

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Thank you.
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I have shipping blankets with grommets around the perimeter. I hang those in the garage to keep noise out/in. The same effect might work with quilts in the bedroom. I'm sure SWMBO wouldn't like shipping blankets hanging in the bedroom.
Bill
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